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Biennial Report of the State Hospital at Goldsboro:
Goldsboro, N.C., July 1, 1924, to June 30, 1926:

Electronic Edition.

State Hospital (Goldsboro, N.C.)


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University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
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Source Description:
(title ) Biennial Report of the State Hospital at Goldsboro: Goldsboro, N.C., July 1, 1924, to June 30, 1926
State Hospital (Goldsboro, N.C.)
32 p.
Raleigh
Bynum Printing Company
1926

Call number C362.2 N87sg 1926-1942 (North Carolina Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)



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[Title Page]


BIENNIAL REPORT
OF
THE STATE HOSPITAL
AT GOLDSBORO
GOLDSBORO, N. C.
JULY 1, 1924, TO JUNE 30, 1926

RALEIGH
BYNUM PRINTING COMPANY
STATE PRINTERS
1926


Page 2

        

        

        


Page 3

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

OCTOBER 20, 1926.

HON. A. W. MCLEAN, Governor, Raleigh, N. C.

        DEAR SIR:--I transmit you herewith report of Dr. W. W. Faison, Superintendent, State Hospital, near Goldsboro. I think after reading this report in connection with the State Auditor's for period ending June 30th, 1926, you will be convinced that Dr. Faison is running this institution not only on humane lines and efficiently but economically.

        According to the Auditor's report, it has cost 47c. per day per capita to maintain the inmates of this institution. This cost also applies to sixty-five of the criminal insane that are located at this institution. These men and women of course do not work. This institution has to furnish heat, lights, food and clothes, and special guards for these criminal insane, and as they cannot go outside of the building they produce nothing, and this makes an additional expense for maintenance. But for this expense his cost per capita would come down to about 44c. Dr. Faison, as Superintendent of this institution, is running same as far as economy is concerned just as cheaply as possible.

        If we are to get this cost down below where it is now we have got to produce more. Last year where we killed about 30,000 pounds of pork, this year we expect to kill 60,000 pounds. We also expect to increase our herd of cattle so as to increase our milk supply. If this institution is to reduce this cost per capita we must grow more vegetables and more food stuff and produce more butter fat and meat. To that end we must have additional land. This institution has approximately 700 acres of land. Probably 20% of this land is in the river swamps and a good part of it in highland woods. From the latter place the institution gets wood and straw. This part of the land, even if it was cleared, would not be suitable for farm purposes, so it is absolutely necessary that the State purchase more farm land on which to grow more farm products and vegetables. To this end we are going to ask the Legislature to appropriate $10,000.00 to purchase 180 acres of land adjoining our present farm, and I am asking that you use your influence to have this appropriation made, because it is absolutely essential to have this land. We now have about 1,500 inmates in the institution. A good percentage of these can work out on the farm and we must have the land for them to work on so that they can produce at least a part of what they consume. I believe when we have purchased this additional tract of land and are able to work more of the inmates on other lines, possibly the making of mattresses and other things, we will be able to get the cost per capita of this institution down very materially from where it is today.


Page 4

        It is the idea of Dr. Faison, Superintendent, and his Board of Directors to classify the inmates of this institution, make all of them that can possibly do so do some character of work whereby they can produce a certain portion of what they consume. To this end we have erected two Colony Buildings that will care for about 100 patients. These buildings are located about the center of the farm where the inmates work. These buildings cost approximately $15,000.00 or a cost of about $150.00 per capita. The former buildings that were erected near the main buildings cost about $750.00 per capita. No more of these expensive buildings should ever be erected.

        As chairman of this board, it gives me great pleasure to say that we have a corps of efficient men at this institution, all working to one end, to give the best service possible at the least cost.

Respectfully submitted,

NATHAN O'BERRY,
Chairman Board of Directors.


Page 5

SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT

GOLDSBORO, N. C., JULY, 1926.

To the Board of Directors, State Hospital at Goldsboro, Goldsboro, N. C.

        GENTLEMEN:--As required by law I herewith submit the Superintendent's report for the period of two years, ending June 30, 1926:

        

Movement of Population

  Males Females Total
Remaining June 30, 1924 480 743 1223
Admitted 456 444 900
Total under treatment 936 1187 2123
Discharged, as recovered 103 99 202
Discharged, as improved 39 45 84
Discharged, much improved 1 3 4
Discharged, as unimproved 17 1 8
Discharged, as eloped 15 0 15
Discharged, as removed 14 1 15
Died 135 165 300
Total removed 324 314 638
Number on roll, June 30, 1926 612 873 1485
Number present, June 30, 1926 604 854 1458
Percentage of cures on number received     22%
Percentage of deaths on number treated     8%
Daily average on roll, 1924-25     1322
Daily average present, 1924-25     1278
Daily average on roll, 1925-26     1451
Daily average present, 1925-26     1403

        

Movement of Population of Criminal Insane

  Males Females Total
Admitted 73 8 81
Discharged, as recovered 5 1 6
Discharged, as removed 2 0 2
Died 11 0 11
Total removed 18 1 19

Ex-Service Men

        Twelve ex-service men were transferred to Tuskegee, Alabama, a Government Hospital. We still have five in the Hospital.

Movement of Population

        The above table shows that the number of patients enrolled on June 30, 1924 was 1223, and the number remaining June 30, 1926, was 1485, an increase of 262 patients.

        During the biennium 900 patients were admitted. Quite a number of these were either senile or feeble-minded, and with good care might have been kept at the County Home and thus given more room in the Hospital for acute and dangerous patients.


Page 6

        We had somewhat more sickness than usual. We had an epidemic of influenza, one of gastro enteritis and a number of cases of atypical smallpox. All patients are vaccinated on admission, but in some way a few proved to be unprotected.

        On September 10, 1924, fifty-four criminal insane patients, forty-eight men and six women, were brought to this institution from the State Prison at Raleigh. The men were placed in a building prepared especially for them and the women in one of the strong wards for females.

        I regret to have to report that during this period three male patients lost their lives by violence--two at the hands of other patients. The other patient, when advancing upon an employee with a club, received a blow, from the effects of which he died. The Coroner was notified at once and investigated each case. These occurrences are much to be deplored but they do occur in institutions of this kind.

        During the biennium two hundred additional beds for patients have been provided and we now have 1530, 615 for men and 915 for women.

        A detailed account of all permanent improvements will be found in the report of the Building Committee, which is attached.

        The erection of a new mule and hay barn and a Colony Building for thirty male patients, at a more central part of the farm has proved very satisfactory. These are metal-covered, brick buildings, and are semi-fireproof. The Colony Building is a one-story, nicely constructed and equipped with modern conveniences. An additional building of similar construction is now being erected at the Colony to accommodate fifty more male patients who will work on the farm.

        The State Insurance Commissioner has recently had all the electric light wiring at this institution inspected. The wiring in a number of the old buildings was condemned. A full report was made to the Commissioner and the Governor has been informed of the situation.

        Besides the ordinary repairs being kept up the growth of the institution has required additional equipment in the Power House, the Laundry and at the Pumping Station. All of these improvements are shown in the Engineer's report.

Recommendations

        During the time covered by this report our patient population has increased 262. More room should be provided here as soon as practicable, and the erection of the following buildings is suggested for the consideration of the Board:

        1. That the two old wooden buildings for tuberculous patients be taken down and replaced by fire-proof buildings, at more suitable locations. The building for men to have forty beds and the one for women sixty beds.

        2. A dormitory building for women, with capacity for 150 patients.

        3. A dormitory building for men, with capacity for 100 patients. Both of the above buildings to be fire-proof.

        4. A one-story, two-room building in which to prepare fish and vegetables.

        5. A small addition to the Laundry.

        6. An apartment house for employees.

        7. Two cottages for attendants.

Farm and Dairy

        The crops of 1924 were practically destroyed. The crops of 1925 were good, and the growing crops are very promising. The Farmer's Report, which is attached, gives a detailed account of the farm and dairy operations.


Page 7

        

Needs for the Next Two Years

For maintenance for 1927-28 $290,000.00
For maintenance for 1928-29 300,000.00

        

For Permanent Improvements

Building for tubercular males 37,500.00
Furnishing for same 1,600.00
Building for tubercular females 47,500.00
Furnishing for same 2,400.00
Dormitory building for males 10,000.00
Furnishing for same 2,000.00
Dormitory building for females 25,000.00
Furnishing for same 4,000.00
Building for preparing vegetables and fish 3,000.00
Apartment house for staff 10,000.00
Two cottages for attendants 2,000.00
Addition to Laundry building 3,000.00
For rewiring old buildings 20,000.00
Dairy, barn, fixtures and silos 25,000.00
For overhead irrigation system 6,000.00
For purchase of land 10,000.00

        I wish now to express my sincere thanks to the Board, the Staff and employees for their loyal support in carrying on the work here.

Respectfully submitted,

W. W. FAISON, M.D.
Superintendent.


Page 8

        

Table No. 1

SHOWING MOVEMENT OF PATIENTS FOR THE PERIOD OF TWO YEARS ENDING JUNE 30, 1926

  1924-25 1925-26 TOTALS
  Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total
Remaining June 30, 1924 480 743 1,223 ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Admitted 242 213 455 214 231 445 456 444 900
Total under treatment 722 956 1,678 792 1,064 1,856 936 1,187 2,123
Discharged, as recovered 53 38 91 50 61 111 103 99 202
Discharged, as improved 14 16 30 25 29 54 39 45 84
Discharged, much improved 0 0 0 1 3 4 1 3 4
Discharged, as unimproved 6 1 7 11 0 11 17 1 18
Discharged, as eloped 7 0 7 8 0 8 15 0 15
Discharged, as removed 7 0 7 7 1 8 14 1 15
Died 57 68 125 78 97 175 135 165 300
Total removed 144 123 267 180 191 371 324 314 638
              Male Female Total
Number on roll, June 30, 1926             612 873 1,485
Number present, June 30, 1926             604 854 1,458
Percentages of cures on number received                 22%
Percentages of deaths on number treated                 8%
Daily average on roll, 1924-25                 1,322
Daily average present, 1924-25                 1,278
Daily average on roll, 1925-26                 1,451
Daily average present, 1925-26                 1,403

        

SHOWING MOVEMENT OF CRIMINAL INSANE FOR TWO YEARS ENDING JUNE 30, 1926

  1924-25 1925-26 TOTALS
  Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total
Admitted Sept. 10, 1924 48 6 54            
Admitted since 9 2 11 14 0 14 23 2 25
Total under treatment 57 8 65 65 8 73 71 8 79
Discharged, as recovered 1 0 1 4 1 5 5 1 6
Discharged, as removed 2 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 2
Died 5 0 5 6 0 6 11 0 11
Total removed 8 0 8 10 1 11 18 1 19


Page 9

        

Table No. 2

SHOWING CAUSE OF DEATH

  1924-25 1925-26 Total
  Male Female Male Female  
Exhaustion from senile dementia 3 13 13 6 35
Exhaustion from mania 5 2 2 7 16
Exhaustion from melancholia 1 0 0 0 1
Mitral regurgitation of the heart 2 9 0 2 13
Mitral insufficiency of the heart 0 2 0 2 4
Mitral stenosis 0 1 0 1 2
Myocarditis 0 0 0 1 1
Acute cardiac dilatation 0 0 0 1 1
Ruptured heart 0 0 1 0 1
Aortic aneurism 0 0 0 2 2
Cardiac asthma 1 0 0 0 1
General paralysis of the insane 12 5 26 8 51
Paresis 3 5 1 8 17
Pulmonary tuberculosis 4 15 10 19 48
Tuberculosis of the omentum 0 0 1 0 1
Chornic parenchymatous nephritis 0 1 0 1 2
Chronic interstitial nephritis 2 2 2 1 7
Pellagra 4 3 8 12 27
Lobar pneumonia 2 2 0 3 7
Epilepsy 9 1 8 8 26
Status epilepticus 0 1 2 2 5
Influenza 1 0 2 0 3
Hypostatic pneumonia 1 0 0 0 1
Media stinal abscess 0 1 0 0 1
Gastro enteritis 0 2 1 6 9
Entero colic hemorrhage 1 0 0 0 1
Inanition and scurvy 0 1 0 0 1
Cerebro spinal meningitis 0 0 1 0 1
Gumma of liver 0 0 0 1 1
Senile gangrene 0 0 0 1 1
Amoebic dysentery 0 0 0 2 2
Smallpox 0 0 0 1 1
Intestinal intussusception 0 0 0 1 1
Lymphovenus septicemia 1 0 0 0 1
Hyperthyroidism 0 1 0 0 1
Carcinoma of the breast 0 1 0 0 1
Diabetes 1 0 0 0 1
Cancer of the stomach 1 0 0 0 1
Fractured skull 3 0 0 0 3
Puerpurial sepsis 0 0 0 1 1
Total 57 68 78 97 300


Page 10

        

Table No. 3

SHOWING PSYCHOSES OF PATIENTS ADMITTED

  1924-25 1925-26 Total
  Male Female Male Female  
Senile Psychoses          
Simple deterioration 12 19 31 12 74
Depressed and agitated 0 6 0 7 13
Pre-senile 0 3 0 0 3
Paranoid 1 0 2 0 3
Manic Depressive          
Manic type 44 64 40 68 216
Depressed type 8 9 5 6 28
Mixed type 1 3 0 2 6
Dementia Proecox          
Hebephrenic type 23 19 3 7 52
Simple type 56 0 40 0 96
Paranoid type 5 5 4 6 20
Catatonic type 0 3 0 0 3
Psychosis with cerebral syphilis 14 9 5 0 28
Psychosis with syphilis 24 34 19 61 138
Psychosis with epilepsy 18 9 17 8 52
Psychosis with pellagra 4 9 7 19 39
Psychosis with tuberculosis 3 0 0 3 6
Psychosis with flu 1 1 1 1 4
Psychosis with mental deficiency 10 5 20 4 39
Psychosis with constitutional psychopathic inferiority 3 3 2 7 15
Psychosis with menopause 0 6 0 8 14
Psychosis with pregnancy 0 1 0 1 2
Psychosis with goiter 1 2 1 4 8
Psychosis with hysteria 0 0 0 1 1
Psychosis with cardio-renal disease 2 0 0 0 2
Psychosis with catamenia 0 0 0 1 1
Psychosis with arterio-schlerosis 0 1 0 0 1
Psychosis, delirium with infectious disease 1 0 0 0 1
Psychosis with childbirth 0 0 0 2 2
Traumatic psychosis 5 0 3 0 8
Alcoholic psychosis 5 0 1 0 6
Narcotic psychosis 0 0 0 1 1
Post infectious psychosis 1 2 0 0 3
General paralysis 0 0 11 0 11
Paresis 0 0 0 1 1
Paranoia or paranoic conditions 0 0 2 0 2
Not insane 0 0 0 1 1
Total 242 213 214 231 900


Page 11

        

Table No. 4

SHOWING DURATION OF INSANITY ON ADMISSION

  1924-25 1925-26 Total
  Male Female Male Female  
Less than 1 month 43 47 41 56 187
From 1 to 3 months 28 30 27 24 109
From 3 to 6 months 17 21 12 18 68
From 6 to 12 months 7 18 20 23 68
From 1 to 2 years 12 16 24 14 66
From 2 to 3 years 14 12 10 9 45
From 3 to 4 years 5 10 3 13 31
From 4 to 5 years 1 4 7 4 16
From 5 to 10 years 13 17 7 16 53
From 10 to 20 years 11 6 8 10 35
From 20 to 30 years 0 4 0 4 8
From 30 to 40 years 1 1 1 0 3
From 40 to 50 years 1 0 1 0 2
From 60 to 70 years 0 0 1 0 1
Not stated 89 27 52 40 208
Total 242 213 214 231 900

        

Table No. 5

SHOWING SOCIAL RELATION

  1924-25 1925-26 Total
  Male Female Male Female  
Single 91 61 102 61 315
Married 72 107 76 131 386
Widowed 10 28 15 29 82
Divorced 2 6 2 4 14
Not stated 67 11 19 6 103
Total 242 213 214 231 900


Page 12

        

Table No. 6

SHOWING DURATION OF RESIDENCE IN HOSPITAL OF THOSE CURED

  1924-25 1925-26 Total
  Male Female Male Female  
Less than 3 months 2 1 2 0 5
From 3 to 6 months 17 9 21 18 65
From 6 to 12 months 19 19 19 20 77
From 1 to 2 years 12 5 4 19 40
From 2 to 3 years 2 0 2 2 6
From 3 to 4 years 1 3 0 1 5
From 4 to 5 years 0 1 1 0 2
From 5 to 10 years 0 0 1 1 2
Total 53 38 50 61 202

        

Table No. 7

SHOWING DURATION IN HOSPITAL OF THOSE WHO DIED

  1924-25 1925-26 Total
  Male Female Male Female  
From 1 to 5 days 1 1 3 0 5
From 5 to 30 days 12 9 11 21 53
From 1 to 3 months 8 8 14 12 42
From 3 to 6 months 5 7 9 7 28
From 6 to 12 months 9 7 13 4 33
From 1 to 2 years 8 7 10 10 35
From 2 to 3 years 3 8 10 8 29
From 3 to 4 years 4 1 1 7 13
From 4 to 5 years 0 3 1 9 13
From 5 to 10 years 1 9 4 9 23
From 10 to 15 years 2 3 1 4 10
From 15 to 20 years 2 3 1 4 10
From 20 to 30 years 2 2 0 2 6
Total 57 68 78 97 300


Page 13

        

Table No. 8

SHOWING AGE WHEN ADMITTED

  1924-25 1925-26 Total
  Male Female Male Female  
From 5 to 10 years 0 2 1 3 6
From 10 to 20 years 30 14 32 22 98
From 20 to 30 years 57 62 47 62 228
From 30 to 40 years 23 50 34 56 163
From 40 to 50 years 31 34 32 44 141
From 50 to 60 years 19 14 22 17 72
From 60 to 70 years 8 10 19 10 47
From 70 to 80 years 5 10 10 10 35
From 80 to 90 years 2 2 1 1 6
From 90 to 100 years 1 0 0 0 1
Not stated 66 15 16 6 103
Total 242 213 214 231 900


Page 14

REPORT OF THE CLINICAL DIRECTOR

DR. W. W. FAISON, Superintendent State Hospital, Goldsboro, N. C.

        DEAR SIR:--I herewith submit the following report of this department for the year from July 1st, 1925, to June 30th, 1926:

        The regular custom of giving each patient a careful physical and mental examination as soon after admission as possible has been adhered to, and the results recorded.

        We have continued our special efforts in the diagnosis and treatment of syphilis with the most gratifying results. Quite a number of patients who were admitted apparently afflicted with dementia præcox, cleared up very nicely under anti-syphilitic treatment and went home apparently perfectly restored. Practically all these cases, upon being restored, gave a personal history of some rather chronic physical ailment, such as persistent headaches, "nervousness," chronic indigestion, rheumatism, etc., and all went home rejoicing that they felt better than they had for years.

        Nearly three thousand doses of intra-venous treatments were administered during the year, besides many thousand tablets of mixed treatment.

        For some unaccountable cause we have had more cases of pellagra, both among the male and female patients, this year than for several years past. Many of them of a very severe form. Practically all the cases were admitted to the Hospital with the trouble--not developing in the institution. Besides dietary means, we have found yeast to give the best results in the treatment of the disease.

        We have found but few cases of hook worm. These were treated with carbon tetrachloride with good results. We have not had as many cases of round worm as we did last year, probably due to the very extensive treatment at that time.

        Post-mortems were performed on seven occasions for diagnostic purposes during the year, and the findings recorded and specimens preserved.

        The following work was done in the pathological laboratory during the past year:

        
Urinalysis 1506
Sputum examinations 190
Blood examinations 92
Urethral and vaginal discharges examined 16
Feces examined 260
Blood counts 10
Pathological specimens prepared and mounted 8
Total 2082

Respectfully submitted,

F. L. WHELPLEY, M.D.,
Clinical Director.


Page 15

REPORT BUILDING COMMITTEE

DR. W. W. FAISON, Superintendent State Hospital, Goldsboro, N. C.

        DEAR DR. FAISON:--I beg to submit you herewith report covering Building Activities at the State Hospital near Goldsboro, N. C., for the fiscal years 1925-26.

        Prior to June 1, 1925 the following buildings were erected out of what is known as Local Cash:

        
Four Cottages for Attendants $4,006.07
Alterations to Apartment House 1,236.17
Alterations to Dentist Cottage 353.52
  $5,595.76

        At the session of the Legislature held January-February, 1925, an appropriation of $20,000.00 was made for the erection of a Mule Barn. This money was expended as follows:

        
Mule Barn $14,335.27
Deep Well and Pumping Outfit 620.00
Colony Building for Attendants 5,044.73
  $20,000.00

        There was appropriated by the same Legislature $25,000.00 for the erection of a new wing to the Criminal Insane Building, and $15,000.00 for furnishing same, and for the erection of a fence around the Criminal Insane Building. The above amount was expended as follows:

        
New Building $24,785.03
Furnishing same 4,596.88

        This left a balance of $10,608.09. This amount was used in the erection of a Second Colony Building. Both of these Colony Buildings we erected with the approval of the Governor, as at that time, as you know, we had no room anywhere for patients that were committed to this Institution.

        These two Colony Buildings have a capacity for a hundred patients, as well as dining-room and kitchen.

        It is well to call your attention to the fact that all buildings erected prior to this time for the insane cost from seven to eight hundred dollars per capita; these Coloney Buildings cost a fraction over $150.00 per capita. These buildings are erected in the center of the farm and are semi-fire proof, and the patients are much pleased by being located out there.

Respectfully submitted.

NATHAN O'BERRY,
Chairman Building Committee State Hospital.


Page 16

ENGINEER'S REPORT

DR. W. W. FAISON, Superintendent, State Hospital, Goldsboro, N. C.

        SIR:--I herewith submit the following report as engineer for the two years ending June 30th, 1926.

        New building completed and buildings put into service as follows: New Kitchen Building, a brick building 50' by 75' having slate roof, concrete basement floor, and tiled main floor. Main floor occupied by officers' and patients' kitchens, serving rooms, and cold storage rooms. Basement contains Bakery and storage room. Building erected and lighting system installed on contract, Institution furnishing all common labor. Engineers force installed plumbing and equipment.

        Criminal Insane Building, a two-story fireproof brick and concrete structure with concrete floors and composition covered concrete roof. Building, plumbing, lighting system, and courtyard fence erected and installed on contract; institution furnishing all common labor. Engineers force installed light fixtures and window-guards in center section and one wing, steel pipe frame bunks in one wing, and concrete base under fence and barbed wire at top of fence and around top of building.

        New Mule Barn; a brick and concrete building 32' by 148' two stories high, asbestos shingle roof and concrete floors. Built with hired masons and carpenters, all common labor furnished by Institution. Engineers force installed lighting system and water system. In connection with barn, wagon and implement sheds covering 6244 square feet were built from material taken out of the old mule barn.

        Four one-story, four-room, frame cottages were built with hired carpenters, and Institution common labor, for colored employees. Engineers installing electric lights and driving wells.

        Farm Colony Building, a one story brick building with plastered walls and ceilings and concrete floor, built under supervision of engineer by hired carpenters and masons and Institution common labor. Plumbing, lighting system, and sewerage disposal plant put in by engineers force.

        Poultry Farm Building consisting of three brooder houses 10' by 12' and one laying house 20' by 70' built by Institution forces and hired carpenters.

        Two rooms and back porch added to apartment house and one room to Dentist's cottage. Common labor furnished by Institution, plumbing and lights installed by engineers force.

        New equipment purchased in engineering department includes the following: A 10,000-gallon per hour, hot water heater installed on contract, in power plant.

        One type MSAM Wallace and Tiernan chlorinator for sterilizing the treated water installed by engineers force.

        One Bristol recording pressure gage for recording pressure in water system at all times.

        One 1' motor-driven centrifugal brine circulating pump.

        One 42' motor-driven extractor and one 42' by 60' motor-driven tumbler dryer installed in Laundry by engineers force.

        One Dayton shallow well pumping outfit with electric drive and automatic control installed at Mule Barn.


Page 17

        Some of the more important repairs and alterations during the past two years are:

        All studding partition walls on lower floor of McKinne Building have been replaced with brick walls plastered with cement.

        Bulkhead walls have been built in tunnels under power plant to protect the plant in case of flood.

        Old mule barn and tool sheds have been torn down.

        Old kitchen and bakery has been converted into a dining room and store room. Plumbing, heating, and lighting changed as necessary.

        Sixteen employees cottages have been equipped with electric lights, as well as their outside kitchens.

        Street lights have been installed around Criminal Insane Building and along the front of the colored employees cottages.

        A flight of 32 concrete steps has been built from upper to the lower level at North end of Aycock Building.

        Fire wall has been built through attic and roof between North male wing and center part of building.

        4,232 square feet of concrete floor and sidewalk, (exclusive of new buildings) has been put down.

        24,000 square feet wooden floors have been renewed and 500 wooden stair treads have been replaced.

        2,800 square feet metal roof has been painted with red lead and linseed oil paint.

        Eleven new automatic prison type closets have been installed.

        Plumbing in Female Epileptic building has been renewed throughout.

        Lighting lines have been run to Farmer's Cottage, Mule Barn, and Colony Building.

        The regular routine repair work in the plant and in the buildings has been kept up.

Respectfully submitted,

D. R. HOLT, Engineer.


Page 18

        

REPORT OF FARM, GARDEN AND DAIRY PRODUCTS

For One Year, Ending June 30, 1925

  Quantities Price Amount
Corn 310 barrels @ $ 5.50 $ 1,705.00
Grass hay 23 tons @ 30.00 690.00
Cabbage 443 barrels @ 1.50 664.50
Cucumbers 250 bushels @ 1.00 250.00
Cantaloupes 648 bushels @ 1.00 648.00
Clover hay 32½ tons @ 30.00 975.00
Dressed pork 36,664 pounds @ .10 3,666.40
Squash 109 bushels @ .75 81.75
Onion heads 120 bushels @ 1.00 120.00
Okra 60 bushels @ 1.00 60.00
Apples 540 bushels @ 1.00 540.00
Tomatoes 537 bushels @ 1.25 665.00
Peaches 84 bushels @ 2.00 168.00
Green corn 15 stands @ 1.00 15.00
Watermelons 11,800 @ .10 1,180.00
Grapes 370 bushels @ 2.00 740.00
Lima beans, green 125 bushels @ 1.00 125.00
Lima beans, dry 85 bushels @ 4.00 340.00
Green peas 130 bushels @ 1.00 130.00
Figs 43 bushels @ 2.00 86.00
Egg plant 30 bushels @ 1.50 45.00
Pepper 26 bushels @ 2.00 52.00
String beans 678 bushels @ 2.50 1,695.00
Turnips 230 bushels @ .50 115.00
Rutabagas 1,817 bushels @ .50 908.50
Sweet potatoes 390 bushels @ 1.00 390.00
Pea vine hay 9 tons @ 30.00 270.00
Peanuts in vine 6 tons @ 30.00 180.00
Collards 9,350 heads @ .05 467.50
Spring salad 566 bushels @ .50 283.00
Dewberries 44 bushels @ 2.50 110.00
Strawberries 154 bushels @ 2.50 385.00
Raspberries 10 bushels @ 3.00 30.00
Garden peas 168 bushels @ 2.50 420.00
Spring turnips 242 bushels @ .50 121.00
Beets 128 bushels @ 1.00 128.00
Lettuce 525 heads @ .05 26.25
Kraut 31 barrels @ 5.00 155.00
Oats 3,860 bushels @ .60 2,316.00
Rye 73½ bushels @ 3.00 235.00
Grain straw 80 tons @ 15.00 1,200.00
Irish potatoes 1,350 bushels @ 1.00 1,350.00
Corn ensilage 300 tons @ 6.00 1,800.00
Corn stover 50 tons @ 10.00 500.00
Soy beans 40 bushels @ 3.00 120.00
Wood cut and hauled 150 cords @ 2.00 300.00
Wood cut for stove 50 cords @ 2.00 100.00
Manure 1,500 loads @ 1.00 1,500.00
Sand and dirt hauled, building and grading 1,000 loads @ .25 250.00
Brick and cement unloaded for building 12 cars @ 10.00 120.00
Cinders hauled for grading railroad 300 loads @ .25 75.00
Cotton picked 286,290 pounds @ -- 4,225.76


Page 19

        
Milk 36,423 gallons @ $ 0.50 $ 18,211.50
Beef 14,809 pounds @ .11 1,628.99
Hides 1,140 pounds @ .05 57.00
Total       $ 52,620.65

Respectfully submitted,
D. H. NEWELL, Farmer.

        

REPORT OF FARM, GARDEN AND DAIRY PRODUCTS

For One Year, Ending June 30, 1926

  Quantities Price Amount
Corn 1,000 barrels @ $ 5.00 $ 5,000.00
Corn ensilage 380 tons @ 6.00 2,280.00
Corn stover 130 tons @ 15.00 1,950.00
Oats 4,260 bushels @ .60 2,556.00
Grain straw 85 tons @ 15.00 1,266.00
Rye 100 bushels @ 3.00 300.00
Hay 126 tons @ 30.00 2,412.00
Cowpeas 42 bushels @ 4.00 168.00
Sweet potatoes 2,010 bushels @ 1.00 2,010.00
Peanuts in vine 5 tons @ 30.00 150.00
Dressed pork 27,267 pounds @ .15 4,090.05
Collards 19,000 heads @ .05 950.00
Rutabagas 1,200 bushels @ .50 600.00
Turnips 1,500 bushels @ .50 750.00
Lima beans, green 340 bushels @ 1.00 340.00
Lima beans, dry cleaned 140 bushels @ 4.00 560.00
Spring salad 1,200 bushels @ .50 600.00
Leeks 700 bushels @ .50 350.00
Cabbage 310 barrels @ 2.00 620.00
Cabbage kraut 51 barrels @ 5.00 255.00
Beets 85 bushels @ 1.00 85.00
Canteloupes 345 bushels @ 1.00 345.00
Watermelons 1,615 @ .15 242.25
Green peas 75 bushels @ .50 37.50
Cucumbers 42 bushels @ 1.00 42.00
Green corn 140 bushels @ .50 70.00
Sweet pepper 25 bushels @ 2.00 50.00
Onion heads 215 bushels @ 1.00 215.00
Tomatoes 383 bushels @ 2.00 766.00
String beans 230 bushels @ 2.00 460.00
Grapes 30 bushels @ 2.00 60.00
Okra 110 bushels @ 1.00 110.00
Irish potatoes 600 bushels @ 2.00 1,200.00
Garden peas 120 bushels @ 3.00 360.00
Apples 82 bushels @ 1.00 82.00
Figs 10 bushels @ 2.00 20.00
Egg plant 10 bushels @ 1.00 10.00
Spinach 100 bushels @ .50 50.00
Lettuce 400 heads @ .05 20.00
Strawberries 10 bushels @ 3.00 30.00
Dewberries 40 bushels @ 3.00 120.00
Peaches 12 bushels @ 3.00 36.00
Asparagus 25 bunch @ .20 5.00
Cotton picked at various prices 539,953 pounds @ ---- 7,608.88


Page 20

        
Cords wood, cut and hauled 200 cords @ $ 2.00 $ 400.00
Brick unloaded and hauled 22 cars @ 10.00 220.00
Sand and gravel hauled 600 loads @ 1.00 600.00
Lime and cement hauled 6 cars @ 10.00 60.00
Sand and cinders hauled, for repairs 400 loads @ 1.00 400.00
Cow pasture 90 acres @ 12.00 1,080.00
Manure 1,500 loads @ 1.00 1,500.00
Milk 46,359 gallons @ .60 27,815.40
Beef 3,015 pounds @ .12 361.80
Hides ----   ---- 53.65
Calves, sold on foot 530 pounds @ .08 42.40
Chickens, old 188 pounds @ .20 37.60
Chickens, young 504 pounds @ .45 222.20
Eggs 660 dozen @ .35 231.00
Government check for condemned cattle       150.00
Total       $ 72,405.33

Respectfully submitted,
D. H. NEWELL, Farmer.

SEWING ROOM REPORT

        

For Two Years, Ending June 30, 1926

  1924-25 1925-26
Aprons 285 374
Awnings 3 3
Bodies 584 17
Ball dresses 31 0
Ball dress sashes 31 0
Baby clothes 19 36
Bed ticks 0 787
Blankets marked 1,317 435
Capes 617 26
Caps 36 19
Chemise 5,177 205
Combinations 636 1,234
Coats 140 489
Covers, mattress 0 479
Covers, dresser 0 27
Covers, table 2 0
Covers, for stretcher 3 0
Curtains 308 396
Dresses 2,783 2,052
Drawers 1,275 2,242
Fruit sacks 220 0
Filtering cloths 6 0
Gowns 94 671
Indestructible dresses 177 0
Ironing sheets 48 50
Ice bags 0 6
Jackets 6 0
Laundry bags 6 8
Meat sacks 0 200
Napkins 72 0
Pants 1,793 901
Pillow cases 920 547
Pillows for coffins 0 165


Page 21

        
Shirts 691 2,156
Skirts 0 439
Shrouds 122 165
Sheets 178 1,173
Suspenders 155 579
Table cloths 11 31
Towels 191 1,572
Underskirts 83 0

Respectfully submitted,
LIZZIE MEARES, Seamstress.

        

HOUSEKEEPER'S REPORT FOR TWO YEARS, ENDING JUNE 30, 1926

  1924-25 1925-26
Grape jelly 44 quarts ----
Strawberry preserves 26 quarts ----
Fig preserves ---- 30 quarts
Pear preserves ---- 34 quarts
Dewberry jam ---- 24 quarts
Tomato pickles 50 quarts 38 quarts
Butter 467½ pounds 5,095½ pounds
Lard 3,631 pounds 3,333 pounds
Sausage 2,225 pounds 2,446½ pounds
Soap 35,000 pounds 35,000 pounds

Respectfully submitted,

LUNA BRIDGERS, Housekeeper.


Page 23

        

Illustration

[Title Page]


THE STATE HOSPITAL
AT GOLDSBORO
GOLDSBORO, N. C. REPORT ON AUDITS
FOR THE TWO FISCAL YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1926


Page 24

COMBINED REPORT ON AUDITS

HON. BAXTER DURHAM, State Auditor, Raleigh, N. C.

        DEAR SIR:--A combined report is prepared from the audit reports of the State Hospital at Goldsboro, Goldsboro, North Carolina, for the fiscal years ended June 30, 1925, and June 30, 1926, and is presented in the following statements:

        EXHIBIT "A." Fund Assets and Liabilities, June 30, 1926.

        EXHIBIT "B." Permanent Improvement--Revenue and Expenditures for the Two Years.

        EXHIBIT "C." Maintenance--Revenue and Expenditures for Each of the Two Years.

        SCHEDULE C-1.Maintenance--Institutional Receipts by Sources and Functions for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1926.

        EXHIBIT "D."Sundry Receipts--Receipts and Disbursements for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1925.

        EXHIBIT "E."Maintenance--Per Capita Cost for Each of the Two Years.

        EXHIBIT "F."Food Items--Per Capita Cost for Each of the Two Years.

        EXHIBIT "G."Farm Operations for Each of the Two Years.

        More detailed information is shown in the separate audit reports for each of the fiscal years.

Respectfully submitted,

W. E. EASTERLING,
Certified Public Accountant.



Page 25

Exhibit "A"

FUND ASSETS AND LIABILITIES
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1926

        

ASSETS

PERMANENT IMPROVEMENT:      
State Treasurer--Due on Appropriation:      
Appropriations   $ 75,000.00  
Less: Amount made available $ 48,836.88    
Settlement requisition for funds for June expenditures 545.03    
Charged for repayment of loan 15,000.00    
Charged for bond issue expense 45.00    
    64,426.91  
      $ 10,573.09
MAINTENANCE:      
State Treasurer--Unexpended Revenue:      
Appropriations $ 267,300.00    
Institutional receipts 14,987.53    
    $ 282,287.53  
Less: Amount made available $ 225,711.70    
Settlement requisition for June expenditures 16,475.93    
    242,187.63  
      40,099.90
Total assets     $ 50,672.99

LIABILITIES AND SURPLUS

Permanent Improvement:            
Surplus:            
Revenue--Balance ("B")         $ 10,573.09
(Contingent obligation "B" $169.97)            
MAINTENANCE:            
Surplus:            
Revenue--Balance ("C")         40,099.90
Total liabilities and surplus         $ 50,672.99


Page 26

Exhibit "B"

PERMANENT IMPROVEMENT--REVENUE AND EXPENDITURES
For The Two Fiscal Years Ended June 30, 1926

        
  Year 1924-1925 Year 1925-1926
Revenue:    
Appropriations,    
Chapter 192 of 1925 ---- $ 50,000.00
Chapter 192 of 1925--Criminal Insane ---- 25,000.00
Total revenue ---- $ 75,000.00
Over-Expenditure:    
July 1, 1924 3,819.18  
July 1, 1925 ---- 15,000.00
Total $ 3,819.18 $ 60,000.00
Expenditures:    
Furnishing and fixtures (New building) $ 504.72 $ ----
Furnishing (Criminal Insane Building) 351.54 ----
Woman's Receiving Building and addition 7,981.02 ----
Criminal Insane Building 2,299.51 ----
Wire fence construction 44.03 ----
Mule barn ---- 14,335.27
Criminal Insane Building (addition) ---- 29,381.91
Colony Building ---- 5,664.73
Bond issue expense ---- 45.00
Total expenditures $ 11,180.82 $ 49,426.91
Over-Expenditures--June 30, 1925:    
(Covered by loan from State Treasurer repayment provided for in Permanent Improvement Act of 1925, Chapter 192) $ 15,000.00 ----
Balance--June 30, 1926 ("A") ---- $ 10,573.09
Contingent Obligation:    
Contractor's claim for extra work on additions to Criminal Insane ---- $ 169.97


Page 27

Exhibit "C"

MAINTENANCE--REVENUE AND EXPENDITURES
For The Two Fiscal Years Ended JUNE 30, 1926

        
  Year 1924-1925 Year 1925-1926
Revenue:    
Appropriations:    
Chapter 163 of 1923 $ 235,000.00 $ ----
Chapter 163 of 1923--Criminal Insane 27,300.00 ----
Chapter 275 of 1925 ---- 240,000.00
Chapter 275 of 1925--Criminal Insane ---- 27,300.00
Reserved from unexpended balance of 1923-25 appropriations at June 30, 1925 for accounts payable ---- 2,373.87
Institutional Receipts:    
For the period (C-1) ---- 11,501.10
Balance of Sundry Receipts Fund at June 30, 1925 (Fund abolished--Chapter 128 of 1925) ---- 3,486.43
Total revenue $ 262,300.00 $ 284,661.40
Expenditures:    
Office and administration $ 12,975.03 $ 15,448.92
Subsistence 59,568.51 72,307.04
Housekeeping 40,097.77 22,929.75
Laundering 3,365.51 8,864.47
Medical and surgical care 10,013.88 10,220.32
Nursing and attendance 23,881.24 27,095.25
Light, heat, power and water 33,679.80 45,353.33
Care of buildings, grounds and equipment 16,853.07 14,159.24
Recreational 261.16 328.90
Agricultural 26,670.62 27,854.28
Total expenditures $ 227,366.59 $ 244,561.50
Excess of Revenue Over Expenditures for the Period $ 34,933.41 $ 40,099.90
Less: Reserved for Accounts Payable Not Included in Expenditures 2,373.87 ----
Net Surplus for the Period $ 32,559.54 $ 40,099.90
Add: Balance--July 1, 1924 7,293.10 ----
Balance--June 30, 1925 (lapsed and reverted to State General Fund) $ 39,852.64 ----
June 30, 1926 ("A") ---- $ 40,099.90


Page 28

Schedule C-1

MAINTENANCE--INSTITUTIONAL RECEIPTS (BY FUNCTIONS AND SOURCES)
For The Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1926

        
  Subsistence House-keeping Nursing and Attendance Light, Heat, Power and Water Care of Buildings, Grounds and Equipment Agricultural Total
Pay patients' board $ 315.00 $ 105.00 $ ---- $ ---- $ ---- $ ---- $ 420.00
Employees' board 512.38 170.79 ---- ---- ---- ---- 683.17
Board of visitors 92.00 ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- 92.00
Sales of stores ---- 7.55 ---- ---- ---- ---- 7.55
Patients' transportation expenses ----   1,002.89 ----   ---- 1,002.89
Employees' fines ----   87.75 ----   ---- 87.75
Employees' advances ----   222.75 ----   ---- 222.75
Sales of fuel ----   ---- 277.80 ----   277.80
Freight and other refunds and miscellaneous 1.50 ----   287.54 143.76 ---- 432.80
Patients' labor ----   ----   ---- 7,696.79 7,696.79
Sales of products ----   ----   ---- 239.05 239.05
Sales of livestock and hides ----   ----   ---- 307.15 307.15
Sales of scrap and discard ----   ----   ---- 31.40 31.40
Total ("C") $ 920.88 $ 283.34 $ 1,313.39 $ 565.34 $ 143.76 $ 8,274.39 $ 11,501.10


NOTE: Prior to the year 1925-1926 institutional receipts were taken into the Sundry Receipts Fund which was abolished at July 1, 1925.


Page 29

Exhibit "D" SUNDRY RECEIPTS--RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS

For The Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1925
(See note at end of statement)

        
Balance--July 1, 1924 ---- $ 10,665.22
Receipts:    
Board of patients $ 1,261.50  
Board of employees and guests 344.15  
Advances for patients' expenses, counties (contra) 1,899.13  
Patients' labor 4,335.97  
Freight refunds 7.19  
Sales of scraps and discards 439.80  
Sales of farm products 3.05  
Sales of stores 40.89  
Sales of gasoline and oil 6.40  
Sales of livestock and hides 53.80  
Sales of motor vehicles 875.00  
Sales of tractor 278.50  
Sales of raincoats 21.86  
Telephone and telegraph refunds 46.04  
Fines of employees 254.08  
Advances for employees' traveling expenses 316.69  
Dental work 26.86  
Interest on State bond 20.00  
Sale of State bond 990.22  
Southern Railway (recovery of lost carload of coal) 259.07  
Advance to contractor for labor and material 6,815.07  
Rebates and discount on goods purchased 33.03  
House rent 5.00  
Commutation for dentist (Caswell Training School) 104.50  
Pay roll excess 122.94  
Maintenance voucher for criminal insane support (contra) 1,037.32  
Miscellaneous 29.59  
Total receipts ---- 19,627.65
Total--Balance and receipts ---- $ 30,292.87
Disbursements:    
Office and administration ---- $ 424.55
Construction and repairs ---- 5,469.64
Advance for patients' expenses, counties (contra) ---- 334.55
Recreational ---- 263.50
Advance (employees' traveling expenses) ---- 736.37
Expenses (return of escaped patients) ---- 35.90
Outside dental work ---- 16.30
Permanent Improvement:    
Kitchen ranges (drip pans) $ 110.00  
Kitchen ranges (hoods) 550.00  
Kitchen (congealing tanks) 405.00  
Light fixtures 50.00  
Bronze tablets 629.34  
Refrigeration equipment 1,000.17  
Farm residence 655.61  
Criminal Insane Building 6,307.28  
Kitchen Building 6,815.07  
Engineers' fees 1,858.81  
    18,381.28


Page 30

        

Exhibit "D"--Continued

Disbursements:--Continued    
Mule Barn:    
Labor $ 915.83  
Supplies and materials 882.05  
Freight 300.50  
Employer's liability insurance 43.65  
Engineer's fees 750.00  
    $ 2,892.03
Maintenance voucher for support of criminal insane (contra) ---- 1,037.32
Pay roll adjustment ---- 29.00
Miscellaneous ---- 78.03
Total disbursements ---- $ 29,698.47
Balance--Cash--June 30, 1925 ---- $ 594.40
Due from Permanent Improvement Fund, 1925 Appropriation, for Payments on Mule Barn ---- 2,892.03
Balance, Sundry Receipts Fund--    
June 30, 1925, credited to Maintenance Fund as Revenue for the fiscal year 1925-26 ("C") ---- $ 3,486.43


NOTE: Sundry Receipts Fund was abolished by "Daily Deposit" Act, Chapter 128 of 1925. Beginning at July 1, 1925, all receipts are credited to revenue of Maintenance Fund (See Exhibit "C").


Page 31

Exhibit "E"

MAINTENANCE--PER CAPITA COST
For The Two Fiscal Years Ended June 30, 1926

        
  Year 1924-1925 -- Average Number Patients 1,275 Year 1925-1926 -- Average Number Patients 1,407
Office and administration $ 10.21 $ 10.95
Subsistence 46.91 51.22
Housekeeping 31.54 16.22
Laundering 2.64 6.30
Medical and surgical care 7.85 7.26
Nursing and attendance 18.73 19.26
Light, heat, power and water 27.64 31.12
Care of buildings, grounds and equipment 13.50 9.81
Recreational .20 .23
Agricultural 20.96 19.76
Total $ 180.18 $ 172.13
Average per capita cost per month 15.02 14.35
Average per capita cost per day .49 .47
Cost:    
Expenditures ("C") $ 227,366.59 $ 244,561.50
Reserve for Accounts Payable at June 30, 1925 ("C") 2,373.87 2,373.87
Total net cost $ 229,740.46 $ 242,187.63
Average cost per month 19,145.04 20,182.30
Average cost per day 629.43 663.53


Page 32

Exhibit "F"

FOOD ITEMS--PER CAPITA COST
For The Two Fiscal Years Ended June 30, 1926

        
  Year 1924-1925 -- Average Number Patients 1,275 Year 1925-1926 -- Average Number Patients 1,407
Meat, fish and fowl $ 18.26 $ 20.22
Dairy products and eggs .42 .83
Cereal food products 8.20 8.74
Vegetables 1.74 2.01
Fruits and nuts 1.24 1.15
Saccharine products 3.38 3.76
Beverages 3.08 2.83
Condiments, flavors and pickles .25 .33
Fats, oils and miscellaneous provisions 5.08 5.97
Total $ 41.65 $ 45.84
Per capita cost farm products consumed as food 25.53 24.57
Total per capita cost--All food items $ 67.18 $ 70.41
Cost:    
Expenditures $ 52,874.52 $ 64,734.88
Reserve for accounts payable at June 30, 1925 241.43 241.43
  $ 53,115.95 $ 64,493.45
Farm products consumed as food ("G") 32,552.42 34,580.10
Total cost--All food items $ 85,668.37 $ 99,073.55

Exhibit "G"

FARM OPERATIONS
For The Two Fiscal Years Ended June 30, 1926

        
  Year 1924-1925 Year 1925-1926
Farm Operations:    
Farm products consumed as food $ 32,552.42 $ 34,580.10
Farm products consumed on farm 11,841.50 19,067.00
Farm products consumed otherwise 457.00 646.05
Farm labor 4,670.76 8,888.88
Total operations $ 49,521.68 $ 63,182.03
Less: Cost of Operations:    
Out of maintenance ("C") $ 26,670.62 $ 27,854.28
Farm products consumed on farm 11,841.50 19,067.00
Total cost $ 38,512.12 $ 46,921.28
Nominal profit from operations $ 11,009.56 $ 16,260.75