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Thirty-Eighth Annual Report 1938:
Electronic Edition.

Lincoln Hospital (Durham, N.C.)


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University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
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Source Description:
(series) Annual Report
(title page) Thirty-Eighth Annual Report 1938
Lincoln Hospital (Durham, N.C.)
38 p., ill.
Durham, N. C.
Lincoln Hospital
1939

Call number Cp362.1 L73d 1938 (North Carolina Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)



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[Title Page Image]


LINCOLN HOSPITAL
Thirty-Eighth Annual Report
1938

PUBLISHED JUNE 1939
1301 FAYETTEVILLE STREET
DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA


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[Title Page Verso Image]

        Mr. J. B. Duke, Mr. Washington Duke, Mr. B. N. Duke
Mr. John Merrick, Dr. A. M. Moore, Dr. S. L. Warren
Dr. Charles Shepard


Page 3

CONTENTS


Page 4

FOREWORD

        There can be no defense or security for any of us except in the highest development of us all. --BOOKER T. WASHINGTON.

* * * *

        The contribution of the modern hospital to American life has been a significant and concrete expression of the teachings of Jesus Christ. This Good Samaritan has not passed by on the other side, but has offered food, and drink, and medical care to the sick and the afflicted.

        In helping the man who has been set upon by thieves and robbers, we are helping ourselves, for it is impossible for one part of our community to live in plenty and in health, while the other part lives in privation and in disease. We know that the deadly disease germ is no respecter of persons.

        This report of the activities of Lincoln Hospital is designated primarily to do two things:

        To pay tribute to those who have made this work possible, and

        To win new friends whose interest and support will enable us to carry on.

Respectfully submitted,

WM. M. RICH, Superintendent.


Page 5


Page 6

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF

ATTENDING STAFF

Surgery

Urology

Gynecology

Medicine

Obstetrics

Pediatrics

Dental

RESIDENT STAFF

Interns--1938-1939

Surgical Resident


Page 7

CONSULTANT STAFF

General Surgery

Gynecology

Orthopedics

Urology

Dermatology

Medicine

Pediatrics

Obstetrics

Pathology

Clinical Laboratory

Roentgenologist

SENIOR LADY BOARD


Page 8


Page 9

HISTORICAL

        THE FIRST Lincoln Hospital was erected on the corner of Proctor Street and Cozart Avenue with a gift of $8,550.00 from Mr. Washington Duke. The plant was completed in July 1901 and was opened for patients in August of the same year. Mr. Washington Duke first had in mind the erection of a monument, on the campus of Trinity College, now Duke University, to the memory of the Negro slaves for the part they played in the dark days of the Civil War. The late Dr. A. M. Moore, Durham's first Negro physician, together with Mr. John Merrick and Dr. S. L. Warren, convinced Mr. Duke that a hospital for the descendants of the slaves would be more serviceable.

        Through the years the hospital proved its merit and gained public support and confidence until larger quarters were needed. Messrs. J. B. Duke and B. N. Duke, sons of Mr. Washington Duke, offered to give $75,000.00 for a new building provided a like amount would be raised in the community of Durham. It was during the campaign to raise the additional $75,000.00 that the whole community evidenced its appreciation of the work the hospital was rendering the community. Both white and colored citizens, as well as the County and City Governments, responded to the appeal, and the required funds were raised. The new Lincoln Hospital was completed in November 1924 and was opened to patients in January 1925.

        The cost of the site for the new building was $8,500.00, almost as much as the cost of the original hospital. The land was paid for by Messrs. John Sprunt Hill, J. B. Duke, B. N. Duke, and George W. Watts. Credit for securing the present site is due entirely to Mr. John Sprunt Hill.

        The Nurses' Home, a modern, well-appointed tapestry brick building, was added to the hospital later as a gift from Mr. B. N. Duke in memory of his son, Angier B. Duke. This structure was erected at a cost of $25,000.00, and contains bedrooms, reception rooms, class rooms, recreation room, laundry, library and science laboratory. Mrs. Mary Duke Biddle, daughter of Mr. B. N. Duke, has made donations from time to time for improvements to the home.


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        Lincoln Hospital has had only three superintendents during its thirty-eight years of service to the community of Durham and vicinity. The late Dr. A. M. Moore was its founder and first superintendent, and served in that capacity until his death in 1923. His interest was definitely centered in Lincoln Hospital and during the twenty-two years that he served he never accepted any compensation for his services. At his death he bequeathed three houses on Cozart Avenue to the hospital. The income from these houses is to be used to help worthy girls who are desirous of taking nurse training, and to help indigent patients. The income from this property has amounted to $7,500.00. The widow and daughters of Dr. Moore, together with their husbands, donated the equipment and furnishings for the nurses' home at a cost of $1,500.00.

        Dr. Moore was succeeded by the late Dr. Charles H. Shepard as superintendent. The task of organizing the new hospital fell to Dr. Shepard, who was a highly efficient administrator. It was during his superintendency that Lincoln Hospital was approved by the American Medical Association, for the training of interns, and by the American College of Surgeons. Lincoln Hospital also attained national recognition at this time as one of the leading Negro hospitals in the country.

        The success of Lincoln Hospital has been largely due to the guidance and help of several other people, namely: Dr. S. L. Warren, who was one of the founders of the hospital, and is still serving as Chairman of the Board of Trustees. Dr. Warren not only helped to secure the funds to make the hospital possible, but has labored tirelessly in the interest of Lincoln Hospital.

        Miss Patricia H. Carter, R.N., came to Lincoln Hospital in 1912 succeeding Miss Julia A. Latta as Superintendent of Nurses. Miss Carter served in that capacity until 1935 when she was made Assistant Superintendent of the hospital. Her life has been given entirely to the care of the sick and the training of student nurses. The spiritual and cultural qualities of her life have influenced the many students whom she has taught.

        Although not connected with the hospital professionally, no one is more interested in its welfare than Dr. C. C. Spaulding, President of the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company. As a member of the Board of Trustees, and Chairman of the Finance Committee, he has worked untiringly for the advancement of the institution.


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BI-RACIAL ORGANIZATION

        Lincoln Hospital is a striking example of what can be accomplished in a community where both races work together with a common objective. The inter-racial idea is evident throughout the entire organization. The Board of Trustees is composed of both white and colored members, as well as the hospital staff, and the training school committee. The professional work is supervised by an advisory committee composed of five white physicians. Much improvement has been made during the past five years as a result of the work of this committee. A cordial relationship exists between the Negro and white physicians who work together daily in the hospital. This contact is beneficial to the Negro physician because of the superior advantages which the white physicians have enjoyed. In like manner the white physicians have a higher regard for the competent Negro practitioners.

        There is a cordial relationship existing between Lincoln Hospital and the two white hospitals located in Durham County. The superintendents and members of the staffs of Duke and Watts Hospital have evidenced a willingness to assist Lincoln Hospital whenever they can be of help.

NATURE OF SERVICE RENDERED

        It has been the responsibility of Lincoln Hospital during the past thirty-eight years to furnish hospitalization to the Negroes of Durham County and adjacent counties. Until 1930 it was the only hospital available to Negroes within a radius of twenty-five miles. Since the establishment of Duke Hospital additional beds are available to Negroes in this area. Lincoln has gladly accepted the responsibility and its facilities have always been available to those seeking hospital services. Most of the patients coming to us represent the low income group of our population. Many of these people are unemployed and have large families. To all such people Lincoln Hospital has reached out a helping hand. We are proud of the fact that during the past thirty-eight years no one has been turned away from Lincoln Hospital, who was in need of hospitalization, because of his inability to pay. No distinction is made because of a patient's economic or social classification. In fact, our free patients are our most expensive patients. This is largely due to the fact that home conditions are so poor that the patient's resistance has become lowered and more extensive and prolonged treatment is necessary.


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        More patients were hospitalized at Lincoln Hospital and treated in the out-patient departments in 1938 than in any previous year. There were 1827 patients hospitalized and 1995 patients treated in the out-patient department. Of the number hospitalized, 610 were full pay patients, 312 were part pay patients and 910 were free patients. There were 21,847 hospital days rendered to all patients with 67.6%, or 14,731 days going to free patients.

        The main function of any hospital is the care of the sick and injured of the community which it serves. However, we feel that prevention is as important as treatment. Therefore, teaching people how to keep well is a vital part of the program of Lincoln Hospital. We begin with patients on the wards and in the clinics, but we do not confine our efforts to those groups. We try to reach the community through the churches, clubs, schools and other organized groups.

MORTALITY AMONG NEGROES IN DURHAM COUNTY

        The death rate for Negroes in Durham County for 1937 was twice as high as that of the white race. Although the mortality rate of Durham is among the lowest of our southern cities, this percentage is entirely too high as compared with the white race. This should not be so and is due in a large measure to ignorance and poverty. Poor housing, improper sanitation and lack of adequate diet is responsible to a great extent for the high mortality and morbidity rate among Negroes. These factors are responsible in a large measure for the condition of most of the charity patients admitted to Lincoln Hospital.

        We are making every effort to cut down this high death rate through health lectures, motion pictures and classes conducted in connection with our clinics.

TUBERCULOSIS

        Tuberculosis is the most serious problem among the Negroes of Durham County. It is not easy to recognize tuberculosis in its early stages and many people are infected without knowledge of the fact. It has been proved that tuberculosis can be cured if proper treatment is administered in its early stages.

        Lincoln Hospital does not have facilities for the treatment of tuberculosis patients, and we do not make a practice of admitting


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these patients. However, when circumstances demand, we do accept such patients and place them in private accommodations, regardless of the financial status of the patient, until other arrangements can be made.

        We are trying to cooperate with the Health Department in the handling of the problem of tuberculosis. Twice each year this department in cooperation with the State Tuberculosis Sanatorium conducts clinics at Lincoln Hospital. All suspected cases in the county that can be located are brought to the clinics for examination. In addition, the hospital conducts its own Tuberculosis Clinic each week. Patients are given a complete physical examination and such laboratory work as the case indicates. The tuberculin test is given all patients and positive reactors are fluoroscoped and X-rayed. Pneumothorax treatment is given when advisable, and the disease is arrested among many of these patients in the early stages. Advice is given concerning proper diet and rest, also how to protect other members of the family from infection. Undoubtedly this program is accomplishing much good, but the only real solution to this problem is adequate hospitalization.

INFANT AND MATERNAL WELFARE

        In 1937 the infant death rate for babies under one year of age in Durham County was 52.2 per one thousand live births among the white race and 94.2 per one thousand among the Negroes. The same year there were five white babies delivered by midwives and 159 Negro babies delivered by midwives.

        Lincoln Hospital has recognized the hazards involved in the delivery of such a large number of Negro babies by midwives. Here again ignorance and poverty play an important role. Many mothers do not realize the danger attendant upon childbirth, and many who are informed are too poor to have a private physician. Therefore, for the past five years we have been trying to educate mothers of the importance of pre-natal and post-natal care. Each week a clinic is held at the hospital for expectant mothers too poor to have a private physician. Most of the cases are located and brought to the hospital by the public health nurses. The mother is given adequate pre-natal guidance, and every effort is made to recognize any abnormal conditions which might preclude the birth of a normal baby. Those mothers with positive Wassermanns are treated in the clinic so that their


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Illustration

WELL BABY CLINIC

babies will be born free of syphilis. As a result of these clinics, many mothers who would otherwise engage a midwife, are coming to the hospital for delivery.

        The interest in these mothers does not stop with delivery, but they are urged to return at a given time for a complete check-up after the birth of their babies. This service is not only extended to mothers who deliver in the hospital, but for all mothers delivered by midwives in the home.

        When the mother is discharged from the hospital she is advised to bring her baby to the Well Baby Clinic each week. In this clinic proper diets and feeding schedules are worked out, and the mother is instructed in formulae preparations. All babies are immunized against diseases such as diphtheria, typhoid fever and whooping cough. It is our hope to reduce the high infant death rate through the work of this clinic.


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CHILDREN'S WARD

CRIPPLED CHILDREN

        PERHAPS THE most interesting and helpful service rendered by the hospital during 1938 was that to crippled children. This service not only covers Durham County but the entire State of North Carolina. Many children who would otherwise go through life crippled and deformed have been transformed into normal children.

        The Orthopedic Department at Lincoln Hospital under the supervision of the heads of the Orthopedic Department of Duke Hospital has rendered a much needed service. Hospitalization for these cases is paid by the Federal and State Governments through the Division for Crippled Children and the Duke Endowment.

        Lincoln Hospital rendered 1,560 days of care to patients under the Division for Crippled Children during 1938. Many of these cases were discharged as completely cured, while others showed marked improvement.


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RESIDENT STAFF--1938-1939

        

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LINCOLN HOSPITAL NURSE TRAINING SCHOOL


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IN-PATIENT CLINICAL SERVICE ANALYSIS

SERVICE Number DEATHS Autopsies Consultations
    -48

        *-48, Patients died within 48 hours of admission to hospital.


+48

        +48, Patients died after 48 hours of admission to hospital.


Total    
Medicine 317 27 31 58 6 26
Surgery 474 17 17 34 12 21
Obstetrics:            
Delivered 157 ..... ..... ..... ..... 1
Not Delivered 45 1 1 2 ..... 3
Newborn 147 7 3 10 6 .....
Stillborn 13 13 ..... 13 1 .....
Gynecology 156 2 2 4 2 8
E. E. N. & T. 231 1 1 2 ..... 5
Dermatology 11 ..... ..... ..... ..... 4
Communicable 32 1 4 5 ..... 4
Urology 70 ..... 5 5 2 7
Orthopedics 187 1 5 6 3 9
TOTAL 1840 70 69 139 32 88

OBSTETRICAL CASES

DELIVERIES BIRTHS DEATHS
  No. Alive Still Total Mothers Babies Total
Premature 14 7 7 14 0 12 12
Term 143 140 6 146 0 11 11
TOTAL 157 147 13 160 0 23 23
Complications:              
By forceps 9 7 2 9 0 2 2
Caesarian Section 1 1 0 1 1 2 3
Eclampsia 4 4 0 4 0 0 0


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OUT-PATIENTS TREATED

SERVICE FIRST VISIT TOTAL VISITS
Medicine 326 1,496
Surgery 1,142 1,678
Gynecology 38 267
Obstetrics 220 730
E. E. N. & T. 13 13
Tuberculosis 108 138
Urology 45 282
Orthopedics 103 377
TOTAL 1,995 4,981

        

X-RAY EXAMINATIONS

  PATIENTS FILMS MADE FLUOROSCOPIC
In-Patients 742 1,254 23
Out-Patients 179 232 1
TOTAL 921 1,486 24


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LABORATORY EXAMINATIONS

  IN-PATIENTS OUT-PATIENTS
URINALYSIS:    
Routine 2,431 565
Functional 15 0
Quantitative 12 0
Culture 18 0
Others 1 0
BLOOD EXAMINATION:    
R. B. C. 1,832 197
W. B. C. 1,929 139
Differential 209 4
Hemoglobin 1,804 212
Coagulation Time 96 101
Typing 254 509
Wassermann 1,645 1,099
Widal 26 0
Others 16 0
BLOOD CHEMISTRY:    
Blood Sugar 97 9
Blood Urea 1 0
Non-Protein Nitrogen 152 1
Creatinin 133 0
Uric Acid 27 0
Others 10 0
TISSUE:    
Gross 186 0
Microscopic 186 0
SPINAL FLUID:    
Cell Counts 50 0
Colloidal Gold 12 0
Cultures 37 0
Globulin 56 64
Wassermann 42 0
Others 29 0
GASTRIC ANALYSIS 13 0
STOOL EXAMINATION 6 1
SMEAR 396 81
SPUTUM EXAMINATION 245 5
EXUDATE 20 0
TRANSUDATE 10 0
THROAT CULTURE 9 0
BASAL METABOLISM 31 0
AUTOPSY 32 0
MISCELLANEOUS 80 2
TOTAL 12,148 2,989


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LINCOLN HOSPITAL SCHOOL OF NURSING

        

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ANGIER B. DUKE NURSES' HOME

        THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES organized the Lincoln Hospital School of Nursing in 1905. The school offers three years of theoretical and clinical training, and is fully approved by the Board of Nurse Examiners of the State of North Carolina.

        It has been the purpose of the Board to maintain standards which will lead to the highest development of the young women who desire to enter training, and to equip them for the best service in the various fields of nursing. At present there are 180 graduates from the Lincoln Hospital School of Nursing located throughout the country engaged in all branches of nursing.

        The Training School of the North Carolina State Sanatorium (Colored Division) is affiliated with Lincoln Hospital School of Nursing in that their students spend their third year in training at our school.

        The standards of the School of Nursing have been raised by the Board of Trustees to meet the educational requirements of the State. A full-time instructor and an increased number of graduate nurses were employed to meet the changing needs.


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A laboratory for the teaching of dietetics was also installed and additional equipment for the wards was purchased to facilitate better nursing care and to correlate the theoretical work with the clinical experience.

        AFFILIATION: The school of nursing is affiliated with the North Carolina College for Negroes. Psychology, Psychiatry, Chemistry and Bacteriology are taught by members of the faculty of the college. The college library and gymnasium are available for our students.

POST-GRADUATE CLINICS FOR NEGRO PHYSICIANS

        IN OCTOBER we conducted the fifth post-graduate clinic for Negro doctors. These clinics are offered in cooperation with the Division of Cooperation in Education and Race Relations of the State of North Carolina. The first clinic had an enrollment of 135 physicians from North and South Carolina and Virginia, but the enrollment has since been restricted in order to give individual instruction.

        For the past two years we have conducted diagnostic clinics, with the physicians receiving instruction from the bedside of the patients. These clinics last for a period of three days, and at the end of the course held at Lincoln Hospital the doctors are invited to attend clinics being held at Duke University.

        The faculty is composed of doctors from Duke University, Wake Forest Medical School, Watts Hospital, the University of North Carolina and the North Carolina State Sanatorium.

        Physicians attending have reported each year that these clinics have been most helpful and instructive.

TRAINING OTHER HOSPITAL PERSONNEL

        AS A RESULT of requests which have come to us from other hospitals in North Carolina and Virginia, we have offered our facilities for the training of personnel for other Negro hospitals. The newly elected superintendent of one of the largest hospitals in Virginia spent some time at Lincoln Hospital before taking up her duties. The X-Ray and Laboratory technician of one of the Negro hospitals in Detroit, Michigan, was trained in our hospital laboratory. The new hospital at Wilmington, North Carolina, has recently sent their laboratory technician, dietitian and superintendent to us for training. At present we have two students in our clinical laboratory whom we hope to place in some of our small Negro hospitals.


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TRAINING OF INTERNS

        SOME YEARS ago it was almost impossible for all of our medical graduates to receive appointments as interns in hospitals. We did not have sufficient hospitals among our own group, and very few of these graduates were accepted in white hospitals. Lincoln Hospital was one of the early hospitals to offer internships to medical graduates.

        Today we have more hospitals than graduates to fill internships. However, we have not experienced any difficulty in securing our quota of interns each year. This, we feel, is due to the exceptional opportunities offered interns from a teaching point of view. Physicians from Duke Medical School, Watts Hospital and our own attending staff represent some of the outstanding men and women in the medical profession throughout the country.

NATIONAL HOSPITAL DAY

        LINCOLN HOSPITAL reached nearly one thousand people in its observance of National Hospital Day. From 11 o'clock A.M. until 5 o'clock P.M. we held open house. All visitors were shown through the hospital by boy scouts, instructed for that purpose. One of our wards was used to house the exhibits of the several departments of the hospital. These exhibits were both interesting and educational.

        Perhaps the most interesting feature of the celebration was the Baby Reunion, which was held on the lawn of the hospital. Over one hundred babies were registered for the occasion. The merchants of the city contributed prizes and gifts, so that each baby was the recipient of a gift and the more fortunate received very lovely prizes.

        In the afternoon a tea was given in the reception hall of the Nurses' Home to the senior students of the high school and the freshman students at the North Carolina College for Negroes. The Superintendent of Nurses made a talk interpreting the objectives of the nursing profession. The Nurses' Glee Club rendered several selections.

        The celebration came to a close with a lecture and talking picture on syphilis at the North Carolina College for Negroes. This part of the program was in charge of the North Carolina Board of Health, and the lecture was given by Dr. F. S. Fellows of that department. Over 500 people attended the lecture.


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BABY REUNION--NATIONAL HOSPITAL DAY, 1938


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SENIOR AND JUNIOR LADY BOARDS

        AS A MEANS of rendering financial assistance to the hospital, and also in carrying on its program of public relations, we have organized a senior and junior lady board. The functions of these boards are the same as those of other women's auxiliaries in most hospitals. Each board has its own project and operates independently of the other.

        The project of the senior board is the dietary department, and they have assisted in purchasing much-needed equipment for this department.

        The Junior Board is interested in the children's ward. During the past year these young ladies have purchased new cribs for the ward at a cost of $190.00, and assisted in the purchase of other supplies. At Christmas they furnished and decorated a Christmas tree and presented gifts to each child in the hospital.

        The members of both boards act as hostesses for the observance of National Hospital Day and for other public gatherings held at the hospital.

THE DUKE ENDOWMENT

        THE DUKE ENDOWMENT was established by the late Mr. J. B. Duke for the purpose, among other things, of assisting hospitals in rendering service to charity patients. They donate to most of the hospitals in North and South Carolina one dollar per day for each charity patient hospitalized during the year. No distinction is made in the hospitals, all share alike in proportion to the amount of free service rendered during the year. They also offer assistance in the way of advice and counsel in the many problems of a hospital.

        Lincoln Hospital would find it difficult to operate without the assistance of The Duke Endowment. We have, in addition to our yearly donations from this fund, received from time to time special appropriations for the purchase of needed equipment. We also have been greatly benefited by the suggestions made from time to time by their field representative.

JULIUS ROSENWALD FUND

        SINCE THE reorganization of Lincoln Hospital in 1934 the Julius Rosenwald Fund has contributed $3,800.00 for teaching purposes. The present superintendent, prior to assuming his duties, was sent by the Fund to Flint Goodridge Hospital of Dillard


Page 25

University, for one month's observation, also to the Institute for Hospital Administrators, held at Chicago University. As a part of the reorganization program of the hospital a white surgeon was placed in charge of the surgical department for two years, and his salary was paid by the fund for that time. In 1937 a fellowship of $1,000.00 was granted to a Negro member of our staff for post-graduate work in Pediatrics at New York University. A residency in surgery has been established at Lincoln Hospital and the Fund pays the salary of the resident. In addition, our superintendent of nurses has received three scholarships for summer work at Columbia University.

        Our program of staff education would be greatly handicapped without the help we have received from the Julius Rosenwald Fund, and we are indeed grateful to them for their assistance.

WATTS HOSPITAL DONATES LAUNDRY EQUIPMENT

        WHEN WATTS HOSPITAL completed its new laundry the Trustees decided to donate their old laundry equipment to Lincoln Hospital. While this equipment is not of the modern type, it is in good condition and is quite an improvement over what we had. We feel that it will serve our needs until we are able to purchase more modern equipment. This gift expresses the interest of Watts Hospital in our institution and we are very thankful.

IOTA PHI LAMBDA SORORITY AND DAUGHTERS
OF DORCAS CLUB FURNISH ROOMS

        WE APPRECIATE very much the furnishing of two private rooms by the Iota Sorority and the Daughters of Dorcas Club.

        The Iotas decided some months ago that they would like to express their interest in the hospital by refurnishing a private room. They selected room 17 and it is very attractively furnished in maple finish all-metal furniture. The entire cost of furnishings and decorations was assumed by this group.

        The Dorcas Club furnished room 11 when the hospital was first finished. They have kept this room supplied with linen, curtains, and the like since that time. Recently this group decided that they wanted more modern furniture and now this room is furnished in a beautiful walnut finish all-metal furniture.

        The approximate cost of the furnishing of these two rooms, plus curtains, draperies, lamps, etc., was $400.00.


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INTERDENOMINATIONAL MINISTERIAL ALLIANCE

        WE ARE INDEED grateful to the Ministerial Alliance for a donation of $100.00. This contribution came at a time when the hospital was very much in need of funds because of the extra heavy load of charity patients. This gift is all the more appreciated because it was unsolicited and represents the interest of the Negro ministers of Durham in the work of Lincoln Hospital.

OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS

        We express appreciation for contributions from the following individuals, firms and organizations.

HOW THE HOSPITAL IS SUPPORTED

        THE TOTAL income of the hospital for the year 1938 was $69,429.00. Of this amount 32% was collected from patients. The City and County of Durham contributed 33% for charity patients, the Duke Endowment donated 21%, or $1.00 per day for each charity patient, other counties and the State of North Carolina through the Division for Crippled Children paid 7% for charity patients, and from other income 7%.

        68% of our total hospital days were free. The cost of free patients at $3.02 per patient day amounted to $44,618.00. We received the following amounts for free patients.

        
The Duke Endowment $14,708.00  
City and County of Durham (Regular Donation) 17,550.00  
Other Counties and State of North Carolina through Division for Crippled Children 5,117.00  
Dr. A. M. Moore Foundation Fund 540.00  
    37,915.00
Paid by Lincoln Hospital out of its own funds for free patients   6,703.00
    $44,618.00

        In addition to the regular appropriation made by the City and County of Durham, we received a special appropriation of $5,000.00 for replacements and repairs to our plant.

        Because of the amount which the hospital is required to pay out of its own funds for free patients it has been impossible to make needed repairs and replacements to the hospital plant, and


Page 28

still maintain the standard of service which a modern hospital should render. Therefore, if Lincoln Hospital is to keep the high standards intended by its founders it must receive support from sources which it has not reached.

MAJOR IMPROVEMENTS MADE DURING 1938

        The converting and fully equipping of an autopsy room.

        The converting of the old morgue into an emergency dressing room.

        Installing running water in the out-patient department.

        The converting and fully equipping of a dietetics laboratory for the teaching of student nurses.

        New roof on hospital, and new gutters on nurses' home.

        Asphalt tile floor laid in the lobby of the hospital.

        Admitting office built in lobby of hospital.

        New shades throughout hospital.

        New furniture, interns' quarters and dormitory room in nurses' home.

        New filing equipment for record room.

PRESENT NEEDS OF LINCOLN HOSPITAL

        ENDOWMENT FUND. Unfortunately when Lincoln Hospital was founded there was no endowment created for its support. Our present endowment amounts to $11,500.00. We need an endowment of $500,000.00, the yearly income from which, approximately $20,000.00, would aid us in meeting the growing demands being made upon the hospital.

        OPERATING ROOM. We are in need of modern operating room lights, modern scrub sinks, operating room table, and additional instruments and other equipment for the several departments of surgery.

        DIETARY DEPARTMENT. We need electric food conveyors, steam tables, a dish washing machine, and a separate kitchen for the preparation of special diets.

        NURSING DEPARTMENT. We are badly in need of additional rooms in the nurses' home to relieve the crowded conditions.

        HOSPITAL PLANT. We need bedpan sterilizers in the hospital. We also need at least a 30-bed annex to hospitalize tuberculosis patients.


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THE DUKE ENDOWMENT
A TRUST ESTABLISHED BY
JAMES B. DUKE BY INDENTURE DATED
DECEMBER 11, 1924

JUNE 13, 1939
SUPERINTENDENT WM. M. RICH
LINCOLY HOSPITAL
DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA

MY DEAR SIR:

        I am glad to know that steps are being taken for the publication of a bulletin giving the history of Lincoln Hospital and a report of the activities of the hospital during 1938. For some years I have been deeply interested in the work of the Lincoln Hospital and profoundly gratified with the constant improvement in the quality of work so noticeable within recent years.

        Lincoln Hospital is rendering a great and essential service to the City of Durham and Durham County in particular, as well as to that section of the State, in providing good medical care for approximately 2,000 Negro patients a year. Moreover, in doing this the hospital is rendering a large indirect service to Negro hospitals in general in the elevated standards which it has adopted and to which it attains in a most praiseworthy degree. I wish to commend most heartily the work of the Lincoln Hospital and I congratulate the Trustees of the hospital in being able to publish a bulletin in which they should have a wholesome pride.

Sincerely yours,

W. S. RANKIN, M.D., Director.

DUKE UNIVERSITY
DURHAM
NORTH CAROLINA

JUNE 2, 1939
SUPERINTENDENT W. M. RICH,
LINCOLN HOSPITAL,
DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA

DEAR SUPERINTENDENT RICH:

        I have observed with much interest over many years the work of Lincoln Hospital in serving the colored citizens of its community. I knew something of the interests of the donors towards the founding of the Hospital and the hopes they had for it. With limited means to supply the increasing, and already large, demands made upon its services it is fulfilling a difficult task in a noteworthy manner. I feel that Lincoln Hospital justly deserves and will receive the full support of those who become familiar with its splendid service in its community.

Very truly yours,

R. L. FLOWERS


Page 30

CITY OF DURHAM
NORTH CAROLINA

JUNE 1, 1939
LINCOLN HOSPITAL,
DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA

GENTLEMEN:

        Along with other citizens of Durham, I rejoice in that you are to celebrate the thirty-eighth anniversary of Lincoln Hospital.

        From a modest beginning, Lincoln Hospital throughout the years has developed into an institution that means a great deal to the City of Durham. I have watched the progress of this hospital with a great deal of interest. From its very beginning my father, the late Dr. A. G. Carr, took a vital interest in the hospital and through the later years I have been interested in its progress and development. This institution is one of which the citizens of Durham can well be proud and we look forward to many years of continued growth and development.

        WFC:H

Yours very truly,

W. F. CARR, Mayor

COUNTY OF DURHAM
NORTH CAROLINA

MAY 31, 1939
MR. W. M. RICH, Superintendent
LINCOLN HOSPITAL,
DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA

DEAR SIR:

        I have observed with interest the operation of Lincoln Hospital since its beginning and feel that it has been a great asset to the City and County of Durham throughout its history. With small means and a wide and increasing field of service, it has met cheerfully and efficiently the public demands made upon it. It has been no easy task, with the scant assets at your disposal, to meet the requirements of a standard hospital and at the same time to administer adequately to the increasing needs of a rapidly growing community. In the face of such a situation, the hospital has labored willingly and patiently to meet every public demand, and deserves the commendation and support of our entire community. It is a community institution to which we point with pride and without which Durham County would have suffered greatly.

        Durham County wishes for the hospital a career of continued usefulness which shall merit the abiding support of our people.

        DWN:fm

Yours very truly,

D. W. NEWSOM, County Manager


Page 31

JOHN SPRUNT HILL
111 CORCORAN STREET
DURHAM, N. C.

JUNE 2, 1939
MR. W. M. RICH, Superintendent,
LINCOLN HOSPITAL,
DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA

DEAR SIR:

        I thank you very much for calling to my attention the report of Lincoln Hospital.

        I was one of the promoters of Lincoln Hospital and have always been tremendously interested in its work. With such a large colored population as we have in Durham, and with the small means at your disposal, you have labored willingly and patiently to meet all the public demands and you deserve and have the support of our entire community. I congratulate you upon the splendid work that you have done with such limited means. I know from experience that it is no easy task to run a high-class hospital that will meet all the requirements of the medical profession in a rapidly growing community like Durham.

Yours truly,

JOHN SPRUNT HILL

WELFARE DEPARTMENT
CITY AND COUNTY OF DURHAM
COUNTY COURT HOUSE ANNEX
DURHAM, N. C.

JUNE 1, 1939
MR. W. M. RICH, Superintendent,
LINCOLN HOSPITAL,
DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA

DEAR MR. RICH:

        I want to take this opportunity to tell you on behalf of the Welfare Board and my staff how much your splendid cooperation has meant to our work and Department during the past years. We feel that you, your institution and your co-workers under your capable leadership are rendering a most valuable service to your race, to humanity and to the City and County of Durham. We hope it will be our continued good fortune to enjoy the fine relationship and bestow the same fine spirit of cooperation we have enjoyed during the past.

        Wishing for you and your institution continued success and with personal regards, I am

        WES:B

Very sincerely,

W. E. STANLEY, Supt. Public Welfare


Page 32

DUKE UNIVERSITY
DURHAM
NORTH CAROLINA

JUNE 1, 1939

TO THE PRESENT AND FUTURE FRIENDS OF LINCOLN HOSPITAL:

        I have watched with great interest the growth of the Lincoln Hospital during the past twelve years. I believe that everyone will agree that there are few, if any, institutions which have made greater progress during this period. In 1927 the hospital was not approved by the American Medical Association, and cared for an average of 45 patients daily. Today, through the valiant efforts of its friends, both white and colored, Lincoln Hospital is approved by the American Medical Association, and cares for an average of 59 patients daily. Although handicapped by lack of funds for needed equipment and operating expenses, the institution gives its patients a standard of treatment which will compare favorably with wealthier hospitals.

        The Lincoln Hospital's endowment funds provide only .11 per charity patient-day in contrast with $1.13 to $1.51 for the other two Durham general hospitals. Nor does the Lincoln Hospital have the earnings from private patients which the other hospitals have, since 75 per cent of all of the patients are charity.

        The need for the Lincoln Hospital is illustrated by the fact that during this past year it provided hospitalization for 31 per cent of the total charity patients in this area.

        The superintendent, staff and nurses are doing everything humanly possible to maintain high standards of service, and if additional funds can be raised, many more needy patients can be helped.

Yours truly,

WILBURT C. DAVISON


Page 33

NORTH CAROLINA COLLEGE FOR NEGROES
DURHAM

JUNE 7, 1939
MR. W. M. RICH, Superintendent,
LINCOLN HOSPITAL,
DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA

DEAR SIR:

        The Lincoln Hospital has been a veritable life-saving station to the colored people of Durham. The good which it has accomplished cannot be told in a few brief words. It would be impossible to reveal the whole story.

        The establishment of this hospital has resulted in the saving of many lives, the prolonging of health, the alleviation of suffering, and it has been a general blessing to the colored citizens here.

        It is needless to speak about how well this institution is managed. The results achieved speak for themselves. Those in charge have the confidence of those in their profession, and of those in the community generally.

        The institution deserves more generous support than it is now receiving. It should be enlarged so as to extend its scope and power for relieving suffering humanity.

        In summing it all up, I can say with personal knowledge that no institution is better managed than the Lincoln Hospital, and there is no institution more far-reaching in its purposes for good.

        With every good wish, I am

        JES: HHH

Sincerely yours,

JAMES E. SHEPARD, President

DURHAM COMMUNITY FUND, INC.
DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA

JUNE 3, 1939
MR. W. M. RICH, Superintendent,
LINCOLN HOSPITAL,
DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA

DEAR MR. RICH:

        Since coming to Durham about seven years ago I have noticed with interest the demands that have been made on Lincoln Hospital to meet the needs of our rapidly growing city, and I know that it has been no easy task with the assets you had at your disposal. We feel that your staff is giving maximum service with minimum expense. We take this opportunity to express our hearty approval of the good work that Lincoln Hospital is doing.

        As President of the Durham Community Fund, I feel sure I voice the sentiments of our entire community when I wish for Lincoln Hospital a career of continued usefulness which merits the support and confidence of our people.

        BRR: MW

Very truly yours,

B. R. ROBERTS, President,
Durham Community Fund, Inc.


Page 34

CITY OF DURHAM
NORTH CAROLINA

MAY 31, 1939
DR. W. M. RICH, Superintendent
LINCOLN HOSPITAL,
DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA

DEAR DR. RICH:

        It is with pleasure that I take this opportunity to congratulate you and the Lincoln Hospital authorities upon the excellent work you are doing which constitutes an invaluable service to both the City and County of Durham.

        The unusual progress which you have shown during the last five years in the face of almost insurmountable obstacles is deserving of particular commendation.

        I am of the opinion that perhaps one of your outstanding achievements has been the securing of the close cooperation of the staffs from Duke Hospital and Watts Hospital in this city, and that your arrangement with them for consultations and similar medical services has been valuable to you in maintaining the high standard that you have established.

        It is my sincere wish that through your unfailing efforts your institution may continue to develop upon the high plane of efficiency which you have established.

        HAY: DM

Cordially yours,

H. A. YANCEY, City Manager

DURHAM CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA

JUNE 5, 1939
DR. S. L. WARREN, Chairman,
BOARD OF TRUSTEES,
LINCOLN HOSPITAL,
DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA

DEAR DR. WARREN:

        We congratulate Lincoln Hospital upon its 38th Annual Report and congratulate the trustees of today and yesterday upon the splendid record of this institution during those 38 years.

        Durham today is recognized as the chief medical center south of Baltimore. Lincoln Hospital has done its share in building this reputation for Durham.

        Wishing for you in the future the same success you have obtained in the past, we are

        FAP: G

Very truly yours,

DURHAM CHAMBER OF COMMERCE,
By FRANK A. PIERSON, Secretary


Page 35

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
CITY AND COUNTY OF DURHAM
DURHAM, N. C.

JUNE 1, 1939
MR. W. M. RICH, Superintendent
LINCOLN HOSPITAL,
DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA

DEAR MR. RICH:

        For a number of years I have observed the great humanitarian service rendered by Lincoln Hospital. I am aware of the fact that this service at times has been provided when funds were meager. Yet it has been rendered, and Durham City and County has been served in a splendid manner.

        As Superintendent of Health of the City and County of Durham I have had numerous occasions to ask for service through the Hospital. This service has always been graciously granted, and as a result I am confident that many of those afflicted have been greatly relieved. The public health nurses have also been accorded the use of your Institution for the holding of clinics and as an aid in securing the correction of physical handicaps in children. The general public may have little knowledge of the great good which has come to those afflicted and who have had their afflictions remedied, but the members of the Health Department Staff have full knowledge of what you and your workers have done, and I wish to take this means of commending you for this great work and may Lincoln Hospital continue to expand in order that even a greater service may be rendered in the future.

        With kind personal regards and best wishes, I am

        JHE: HU

Very truly yours,

J. H. EPPERSON, Superintendent


Page 36

NORTH CAROLINA MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
JOHN MERRICK, FOUNDER
DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA

JUNE 2, 1939
MR. W. M. RICH, Superintendent
LINCOLN HOSPITAL,
DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA

DEAR MR. RICH:

        As Chairman of the Finance Committee of Lincoln Hospital, permit me to commend you on the fine, constructive service you are rendering the institution. It has been my privilege to be intimately connected with the hospital since its incipiency. Reviewing its work over the years, I do not know of any organization that has rendered a more needed service, or one that has accomplished so much, taking into consideration the limited budget on which the institution is forced to operate.

        Another commendable fact that has characterized the management since the beginning, is the fine spirit of cooperation that has existed. Any physician in good standing can practice at Lincoln Hospital. This attitude on the part of the management has done much to strengthen the ties of interracial good will between members of the medical profession, which fact, together with its interracial board and staff, has brought much to Lincoln Hospital in the way of information, constructive guidance, and professional training.

        I trust the financial limitations under which the hospital is laboring may be lifted to the extent that the full possibilities of the institution may soon be realized.

        CCS: EB

Sincerely yours,

C. C. SPAULDING



Page 37

THE OATH AND PRAYER OF MAIMONIDES

        "THY ETERNAL PROVIDENCE has appointed me to watch over the life and health of Thy creatures. May the love for my art actuate me at all times; may neither avarice, nor miserliness, nor the thirst for glory, nor for a great reputation engage my mind; for the enemies of Truth and Philanthropy could easily deceive me and make me forgetful of my lofty aims of doing good to Thy children.

        "May I never see in the patient anything but a fellow creature in pain.

        "Grant me strength, time, and opportunity always to correct what I have acquired, also to extend its domain; for knowledge is immense and the spirit of man can extend indefinitely to enrich itself daily with new requirements. Today he can discover his errors of yesterday and tomorrow he may obtain a new light on what he thinks himself sure of today.

        "O God, Thou has appointed me to watch over the life and death of Thy creatures; here I am, ready for my vocation."

* * * *


                         Bless Thou the gifts our hands have brought;
                         Bless Thou the work our hearts have planned.
                         Ours is the faith, the will, the thought,
                         The rest, O God, is in Thy hand.


Page 38

FORM OF BEQUEST

        Form of bequest of Personal Estate:

        I do hereby give and bequeath unto Lincoln Hospital, Durham, North Carolina, a corporation created by and existing under the laws of the State of North Carolina, the sum of

        $.............................................................................................
(Seal)

        Form of bequest of Real Estate:

        I do hereby give and devise unto Lincoln Hospital, Durham, North Carolina, a corporation created by and existing under the laws of the State of North Carolina, its successors and assigns, forever, all that certain lot, tract or parcel of land......................................................................................................................

        (Here described the real estate intended to be devised) with the appurtenances, etc. (Seal)

        Kindly send all donations of money intended for the institution, also donations of merchandise or other personal property to Lincoln Hospital addressed to the Superintendent.