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Biennial Report of the State Hospital
at Raleigh, Raleigh, N.C., from July 1, 1924, to June 30, 1926:

Electronic Edition.

State Hospital (Raleigh, N.C.)


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Source Description:
(title page) Biennial Report of the State Hospital at Raleigh, Raleigh, N.C., from July 1, 1924, to June 30, 1926.
State Hospital (Raleigh, N.C.)
42 p.
Raleigh
Bynum Printing Company
1926

Call number C362.2 N87s 1914/16-1936/38 (North Carolina Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

Biennial Report of the State Hospital at Raleigh, N.C., from July 1, 1924, to June 30, 1926 also includes a section entitled "Report on Audit for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1926" that was not digitized.



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BIENNIAL REPORT
OF THE
STATE HOSPITAL
AT RALEIGH
RALEIGH, N. C.
FROM JULY 1, 1924, TO JUNE 30, 1926

RALEIGH
BYNUM PRINTING COMPANY
STATE PRINTERS
1926


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LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

His Excellency, GOV. A. W. MCLEAN,
RALEIGH, N. C.

MY DEAR SIR:

        I have the honor to submit herewith the report of Dr. Albert Anderson, Superintendent of the State Hospital for the Insane, at Raleigh, North Carolina, covering the operations of the Hospital from July 1, 1924 to June 30, 1926, together with a copy of the audit made by Hon. Baxter Durham, Auditor.

        The Board of Directors appreciates the coöperation and support accorded it by you and the Council of State at all times, and especially your prompt response to its appeal for assistance when confronted by the emergency arising from the destruction of the West Wing of the Hospital last spring.

Very truly yours,

C. F. HARVEY,
President Board of Directors.


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SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT

MR. C. FELIX HARVEY, President, and Members of the Board of Directors
of the State Hospital at Raleigh:

        GENTLEMEN:--The biennial report of this Hospital from June 30th, 1924, to June 30th, 1926, is submitted as follows:

        

STATISTICAL SUMMARY


Table No. 1

  Male Female Total
Patients remaining June 30, 1924 651 671 1,322
Admitted during last two years (insane) 565 471 1,036
Admitted during last two years (criminal insane) 78 6 84
Total number under treatment 1,294 1,148 2,442
Average daily population ---- ---- 1,474.5
Restored (insane) 61 84 145
Improved (insane) 327 174 501
Unimproved (insane) 19 30 49
Transferred (insane) 8 1 9
Not insane 2 0 2
Died (insane) 109 101 210
Discharged and transferred (criminal insane) 15 1 16
Died (criminal insane) 3 2 5
Total number discharged and dead 544 393 937
Per cent of deaths on number treated 8.6 8.8 8.7
Per cent of recoveries and improved of number admitted 68 54 61
Remaining June 30, 1926 750 755 1,505

        Our reports on the medical work for two years cover four departments--the insane, epileptic, inebriate and the criminal insane.

        The doctors of my staff have submitted the following reports:

        (See Dr. Adams' report.)

        (See Dr. Ashby's report.)

        (See Dr. Brackin's report.)

        (See Dr. Jordan's report.)

        (See Dr. Young's report.)

        The work of our general hospital service has been satisfactory. The necessary surgical operations have been done by different members of our Advisory Board of Surgeons very promptly when called.

        Our requests for new buildings and reasons for making them are set out fully in our transmittal letter to Budget Bureau.

        We wish again to express our appreciation to the Advisory Board of Doctors for responding so promptly to our call whenever we have work for them to do.


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        Governor McLean appointed the following physicians of the State on our Advisory Board:

        
Dr. T. M. Green Wilmington
Dr. J. F. Highsmith Fayetteville
Dr. J. P. Monroe Charlotte
Dr. Foy Roberson Durham
Dr. Hubert A. Royster Raleigh
Dr. C. A. Woodard Wilson
Dr. W. W. Green Tarboro
Dr. Hubert Haywood, Jr Raleigh
Dr. T. C. Johnson Lumberton
Dr. Chas. O'H. Laughinghouse Greenville
Dr. W. B. McNider Chapel Hill
Dr. E. J. Wood Wilmington
Dr. R. S. Beam Lumberton
Dr. J. J. Murphy Wilmington
Dr. S. D. McPherson Durham
Dr. Jas. Parrott Kinston
Dr. Louis West Raleigh
Dr. J. B. Wright Raleigh
Dr. T. M. West Fayetteville
Dr. Julian Baker Tarboro
Dr. W. D. James Hamlet
Dr. R. L. Pittman Fayetteville
Dr. J. V. McGougan Fayetteville
Dr. H. M. Baker Lumberton
Dr. Jos. Tayloe Washington
Dr. R. D. V. Jones New Bern
Dr. T. D. Kitchin Wake Forest

        I am giving below a report from the Architect, C. C. Hook, and of Wiley & Wilson, our Heating Engineers, covering all the work done in the last two years.

        (See report of Wiley & Wilson.)

        (See report of Chas. C. Hook.)

        Our Auditor's report gives the details of money spent in our building program.

        In conclusion, I wish again to express my sincere thanks to the members of our Board for the great sacrifices they have made in serving this Institution and the fine spirit of coöperation they have given us in the management of the business affairs and building program of this Institution for the last two years.

        The officers and employees of this Institution have been loyal and trustworthy and have striven to promote the welfare and care of our patients in every possible way.

        We are still holding in our mind the same objective that we have always held persistently; that is "to make our Institution equal to any and surpassed by none."

Respectfully submitted,

ALBERT ANDERSON, Superintendent.


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PROFESSIONAL REPORTS

JULY 1st, 1926.

DR. ALBERT ANDERSON, Superintendent, State Hospital, Raleigh, N. C.

        SIR:--Pursuant to your request, I submit herewith the report for the Male Department, covering the biennial period from June 30th, 1924 to June 30th, 1926.

        The general health of the patients in this department has been good. There has been no epidemic diseases. Vaccination against typhoid and smallpox has been carried out. A few cases of psychosis following encephalitis have been treated with tryparsamide and a few cases of dementia præcox have been treated by the production of an aseptic meningitis by the intraspinal injection of sterile horse serum. Sulpharsphenamine, neosalvarsan bismuth and mercury (both intramuscularly and intravenously) have been employed in the treatment of syphilis. I had hoped during this biennium to treat some cases of paresis with malaria, but have experienced difficulty in securing proper malarial parasites. This work, however, will be carried out during the coming biennial period. There were two suicides during the biennial period. One of these occurred in the Main Building and the other occurred at the Hospital Building.

        On April 10th, 1926, about 1:40 P. M., fire broke out in the roof of the Sixth Ward and destroyed the First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Wards and the northern end of the Seventh, Eighth, Ninth and Tenth Wards. The Eleventh Ward was also so badly damaged that it cannot be used until extensive repairs can be made. The patients are being cared for on the porches of the Seventh, Eighth, Ninth and Tenth Wards and on the parts of these wards not destroyed by the fire. Some patients were transferred to Oaks Colony and some were taken home by relatives.

        Even after the burned building has been rebuilt, the Male Department will still need additional buildings. There has been no building in the Male Department for housing patients since the Seventh, Eighth, Ninth and Tenth Wards were built about twenty years ago. I would make the following recommendations: A Receiving Building with a capacity of 75 to 100 patients, a building for untidy patients to care for 150, and a building for inebriates and drug addicts. The inebriates and drug addicts are now cared for on the wards with the insane. Table One of the statistical report will show that we have admitted more male patients than females, which will show the necessity for a Receiving Building for men, a building of this type having already been provided for the female patients.

        On January 1st, 1925, the Criminal Insane building was opened, the Legislature having passed an act that patients of this type should be


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cared for in this institution instead of the State's Prison. The building was too small due to inadequate appropriation and as soon as the patients were transferred from the State's Prison the building was so crowded as to necessitate the placing of beds in the halls. During the past biennial period the building has been enlarged and its capacity slightly more than doubled. For this building I would recommend an occupational therapy teacher and amusements from time to time such as moving pictures.

        The functions of a State Hospital should be:

        1. To receive as many worthy cases as possible.

        2. To restore as many patients as possible to society.

        3. To accomplish the two above objects as economically as is compatible with good treatment.

        With these objects in view, I think the Male Department has made a creditable showing. By referring to Table One of the Statistical Report you will note that more men have been admitted and discharged than women, and by comparison of the payrolls you will note that this has been accomplished very economically.

Respectfully submitted,

R. K. ADAMS, M.D.

RALEIGH, N. C., SEPTEMBER 20, 1926.

DR. ALBERT ANDERSON, Superintendent, State Hospital, Raleigh, N. C.

        SIR:--I hereby submit the report of the Female Receiving Building:

        Since the last biennial report three strong rooms have been added to the Female Receiving Building at a cost of about $1,800. This is the only expenditure that has been made to this building since its construction. The three additional rooms have increased the efficiency of the service but the present capacity is not sufficient and three strong rooms would materially increase our comfort. These rooms could be extended from the three rooms constructed two years ago and on the roof of these three rooms, and the three rooms previously mentioned, we should have a sun porch. This would give the patients at the Female Receiving Building the advantages of sunshine and fresh air which they do not at present enjoy in bad weather and winter, and which is a privilege granted to nearly all of the other patients. The expense of this addition should not exceed $6,000.

        During the past biennial period we have been free from a great deal of sickness, but there was one epidemic of erysipelas which affected an attendant and four or five patients, all of whom recovered. There were no suicides during this period and twelve deaths. Most of these deaths occurred shortly after admission of the patients. Two of them dying one day after admission, another within four days and the longest period


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that any of these patients who died had been in the hospital was fifty-one days. There was also one death which occurred the day after the patient left the hospital after having been in our service for twelve days.

        There has been a decided decrease in drug addiction patients. For the periods of 1924-1925, we admitted thirty patients; 1925-1926 seventeen patients who were drug addicts. On July 1st, 1924, there were in this service four patients diagnosed drug addiction; July 1st, 1926, only one patient of this class.

        We are continuing to make a mental and physical examination of all patients as soon as possible after admission; and we are also vaccinating all patients against smallpox and typhoid fever.

        The continuous baths and hot packs are being continued with benefit.

Respectfully submitted,

J. W. ASHBY, M.D.

RALEIGH, N. C., SEPTEMBER 17, 1926.

DR. ALBERT ANDERSON, Superintendent, State Hospital, Raleigh, N. C.

        SIR:--I herewith submit the report of the Female Department, with the exception of the Receiving Building. There were 533 patients at the end of the biennial period.

ILLNESS:

        All cases of physical illness were sent to the Hospital Building except during the influenza epidemic when it would not take care of all. The general health of the patients has been good except for influenza during January and February, 1926. There were about 150 cases of influenza on this service during that time. Most of the cases had a high elevation of temperature and quite a number had complications. The most frequent complications were pneumonia and otitis media. Very few cases were fatal. We have had no cases of contagious disease. There has been no sudden deaths and no suicides. No serious accident has happened.

TREATMENT:

        The warm continuous baths have been used for excited and noisy patients with good results. Neutral wet packs have been used very extensively for noisy and excited patients with benefit to the patient.

PROGRESSIVE NOTES:

        All patients on this service have had a complete physical examination during this period and a record of the abnormalities found put in their folder. All patients have also had notes made of their mental condition and a record of it made in their folder.


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REPAIRS:

        During the past biennial period G-ward, K-ward, and Female dining room have been painted. No other repairs have been made except ones necessary in an institution of this kind.

NEW BUILDING:

        There has been one ward built on this service. It has ten rooms and is for violent and excited patients. Two continuous bath tubs were installed on this ward.

RECOMMENDATIONS:

        We are in need of a building for noisy and untidy patients. At the present time G-ward, which accommodates 100, is being used for same but its location is bad for this type of patients. It is on the main drive of hospital grounds and all visitors can see these untidy patients on the porch and hear their profane and obscene language. My suggestion is to build a building for 100 untidy and noisy patients, in the pines across from E. B., away from the road and use G-ward for higher type of patients.

        The Female tubercular building needs a floor and some additional rooms. It stays full all the time and some tubercular patients have to be kept on wards with other patients. My suggestion would be to change the room being used for a dining room, and not suitable for such, into single rooms and build a dining room.

Respectfully submitted,

H. B. BRACKIN, M.D.

DR. ALBERT ANDERSON, Superintendent, State Hospital, Raleigh, N. C.

        SIR:--Herewith I hand you the biennial report of the Colonies in the department of my service:

        Movement and condition of the population of Oaks Colony during the biennial period ending June 30th, 1926:

        
Number of patients in the institution at beginning of period 169
Number of patients admitted during period 155
Number of patients readmitted during period 15
Number of patients died during period 1
Number of patients escaped during period 47
Number of patients returned from escape 35
Number of patients at large 12
Number of patients transferred 85
Number of patients discharged 42
Number of patients remaining June 30th, 1926 199

        All patients have been immunized against smallpox and typhoid fever. There have been no contagions or epidemics. The one death reported was due to heart disease. Examinations of and histories written for these received


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not already so treated. Notations of condition of patients have been recorded and filed from time to time.

        On account of the sudden influx of patients from Main Building following fire, Oaks Colony was, and is now, very much congested, and the number of idle patients, due either to feebleness or too mentally disturbed to send out, have added considerably to the problem of oversight, yet these conditions have been met by only an addition of one caretaker to usual force of attendants.

        Due to the fact that a large part of the population at Oaks Colony is employed upon the farm, opportunities for escape are multiplied. It is very gratifying to record, however, that the number of escapes during this biennium have been decreased above 40% over what occurred during previous two-year period.

        At Oaks Colony an increased number of properly heated and ventilated strong rooms are needed to meet the needs of present population. There should also be an increased number of single rooms wherein a noisy patient might be kept over night, otherwise a dormitory of thirty or more patients will be broken of their rest at times for a whole night.

RECOMMENDATIONS:

        All strong rooms, bath and toilet rooms should be screened against flies. Dining-room floor should be repaired. Bath-room floors should be of cement and arranged to drain properly.

MALE EPILEPTIC COLONY

        MOVEMENT and condition of population at the Male Epileptic Colony:

        
Number of inmates in institution at beginning 88
Number of inmates admitted during term 182
Number of inmates died during term 14
Number of inmates discharged during term 46
Number of inmates escaped during term 26
Number of inmates returned during term 15
Number of inmates at large during term 11
Number of inmates transferred during term 14
Number of inmates remaining at term 185

        There have been no contagions. Mild epidemics of influenza occurred during early months of 1926. No deaths, however, from this cause. All patients have been immunized against smallpox and typhoid fever. The prevailing cause of death has been exhaustion from epilepsy. One death was from pneumonia. Examinations, mental and physical, of all new patients have been made and their histories written. Notations of condition have been made and recorded from time to time. With more than double the population of the previous biennium we have experienced only three more deaths this period than the former report.


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On first and third wards we have had repairs during this biennium of cement floors and wood wainscote, which has enabled cleanliness to be maintained with less labor. Notwithstanding population has increased 100% and more, our caretakers have only been increased 25% in number.

NEEDS:

        More properly ventilated and heated strong rooms and single bedrooms are necessary for carefully handling and safeguarding present population.

FEMALE EPILEPTIC COLONY

        MOVEMENT and condition of the population of the Female Epileptic Colony:

        
Number of inmates in institution beginning of term 90
Number of inmates admitted during term 106
Number of inmates died during term 11
Number of inmates discharged during term 11
Number of inmates escaped during term 1
Number of inmates returned during term 1
Number of inmates at large during term 0
Number of inmates transferred during term 5
Number of inmates remaining at end of term 164

        There have been no contagions. Mild epidemic of influenza occurred during the early months of 1926. No deaths, however, from this cause. All patients have been immunized against smallpox and typhoid fever. The prevailing cause of death has been exhaustion from epilepsy. Two patients died from exhaustion from pellagra. Two patients committed suicide. With a population increased by 117% during the biennium there has been but one escape against four during the previous biennium, and the caretakers have only been increased by one. Examinations of all new patients have been made and their histories written, with notations of changes from time to time filed. Notwithstanding the population doubled during the biennium and the fact that there were two suicides as against one in the previous biennium, there was exactly the same number of deaths, as of the previous period.

REPAIRS:

        On A and C wards during this period we have had new wooden floors and cement wainscote, which enables cleanliness to be maintained with less labor.

NEEDS:

        More properly ventilated and heated strong rooms and single bedrooms are necessary for carefully handling and safeguarding the population.


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A WORD ABOUT THE EPILEPTIC PROBLEM IN OUR STATE:

        It will be noted from the foregoing report that as soon as space was available, that in two years' time as many patients were admitted as had been gathered together during the fourteen years that the State had undertaken to provide for that class of defectives. Of course, when there was no space there could be no admissions. Now there is no space again; Male Colony completely full, and Female Colony with less than twenty empty beds.

        Among the new admissions are a number of children, fifteen years and less of age. Many applications for children have been rejected, for the policy has been to provide for the more urgent, those who being so mentally upset that to be refused would mean lying in jail. The children admitted cannot enter public school. The conclusion is, from the above facts, that if the State meets its obligations to this class of the afflicted more room for the epileptic is an absolute necessity. Because a child is afflicted with epilepsy it should not be denied the educational opportunities that would enable him to enjoy at least the three R's in educational advantage. Again, it is agreed by all, that the more intelligent use and appreciation of any organ the less deterioration there will be--the brain is no exception to this.

THOS. M. JORDAN, Physician in Charge.

DENTAL REPORT--JUNE 30TH, 1924, TO JUNE 30TH, 1926.

DR. ALBERT ANDERSON, Superintendent, State Hospital, Raleigh, N. C.

        The Dental Department, which has been under the direction of Dr. T. L. Young since April 21st, 1921, has completed a large amount of work during the past two years. All new patients are seen soon after they are admitted. All focal infection removed and teeth repaired.

        The office is equipped with the Ritter outfit and Wappler X-ray machine.

        The following table will show the work that has been done:

        
Patients seen 2,875
Extractions 2,559
Amalgam fillings 475
Cement fillings 483
Cleanings 1,131
Synthetic fillings 119
X-rays made 118
Plates made 45
Plates repaired 9
Bridges made 4


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REPORT OF ENGINEERS

DR. ALBERT ANDERSON, Superintendent, State Hospital, Raleigh, N. C.

        SIR:--In accordance with your request, we are giving you below a statement of the extent and cost of mechanical equipment work which has been done at your institution under our plans and supervision, and completed within the last two years; the work which is now in progress; and also the estimated cost of future improvements, which we consider necessary to complete your central plant steam-heating system, provide adequate electric generating equipment, domestic hot water distributing mains, and to safeguard your city water supply system and provide better fire protection.

        The estimates for new work include cost of heating equipment for the contemplated new buildings and other minor items, all of which are discussed under the various headings.

MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT WORK COMPLETED DURING THE LAST
TWO YEARS

        The mechanical equipment work completed under our plans and supervision during the last two years is as follows:

        
1924-- Extension of hot water heating mains to the Male Tubercular Building, which was moved to a new location. Cost of this work $935.00
1924-- Installation of new 8-in. exhaust steam supply main from power house to center of main building, to utilize the exhaust or waste steam in the heating system. Cost of this work $3,314.61
1924-- Installation of high-pressure steam connections to new cooking equipment in three kitchens at the Colony Buildings. Cost of this work $632.50
1924-- Installation of steam heating equipment in new Criminal Insane Building. Cost of this work $5,867.40
1924-- Installation of heating equipment in Superintendent's residence, together with connecting mains from central heating plant. Cost of this work $4,375.00
1925-- Installation of heating equipment in Steward's residence, independent plant. Cost of this work $1,160.50
1925-- Installation of heating equipment in new addition to Criminal Insane Building and Strong Rooms. Cost of this work $2,992.00
1925-- Installation of two new 250 h. p. water tube boilers, together with pipe connections and auxiliaries to take the place of three old boilers removed. Cost of this work $26,763.73

MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT WORK NOW IN PROGRESS

        The mechanical equipment work now in progress under our plans and supervision is as follows:

        
Installation of two new 350 h. p. water tube boilers with pipe connections, forced draft equipment and necessary auxiliaries. Cost of this work $41,597.60


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These boilers are being installed to take the place of three old boilers and provide additional boiler capacity, sufficient to supply steam to the Colony Group of the buildings, when connecting mains can be installed for this purpose.  
Heating, ventilating and domestic hot water supply equipment for new West Wing, North and Rear Dormitories, recently destroyed by fire. Cost of this work $31,710.80
New underground hot water heating mains extending from power house to Male Tubercular Building and Seventh Ward, on one side, and from power house to Female Tubercular Building and Erwin Building on the other side, also domestic hot water mains leading along the same lines, all of which are to take the place of present mains which have rusted out and have to be renewed. This work is being done by your own repair department as renewals, and the estimated cost is $11,000.00

        For Recommendations and Estimates for Future Mechanical Equipment Work, see letter of transmittal to Budget Bureau.

Respectfully submitted,

WILEY & WILSON, Consulting Engineers.

REPORT OF ARCHITECT

DR. ALBERT ANDERSON, Superintendent, State Hospital, Raleigh, N. C.

        SIR:--In the past two years, ending with June, 1925, we have made provision for caring for fifty additional inmates in the Criminal Insane department and that building will now accommodate one hundred inmates. A wing was added to the original building and some changes made in the original building, thus giving us the space for the fifty additional beds and also providing a new dining room and serving room to care for the one hundred inmates, the former smaller dining room having been used for bedrooms by building partitions in same. The required number of shower baths and other toilet facilities were also added and two additional rooms for attendants in charge of this wing of the building.

        We were successful in getting this project completed within the amount of the appropriation, and the plan is a very satisfactory one, having been arranged so that this wing may be extended in the future without destroying any part of the present building.

        We took advantage of the ground floor space of the covered way leading from the Erwin Building to the dining room, and built into this space a strong-room wing for women, and provided ten additional strong rooms, well ventilated, lighted and heated; also an attendants' room and double continuous bathroom; the necessary toilet rooms, store-rooms, etc., were also provided and this piece of work is considered one of the best pieces of construction that we have. The utilization of the space under the covered way saved us about three thousand dollars, and


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this wing is entirely above the ground. This wing, also the Criminal Insane wing, are both of fireproof construction.

        The old wooden floors of the Seventh Ward were entirely removed and replaced with re-enforced concrete. Concrete floors were also placed in certain parts of the Epileptic Colony building for men where the old wooden floors had decayed. New tile floors were laid in the serving rooms adjacent to the dining rooms for women and men.

        We awarded contracts July 15th for the rebuilding of that portion of the building that was destroyed by fire on the 10th day of April. The building is now in course of construction, and at the suggestion of Governor McLean, who deemed it wise to take advantage of the overhead expense in connection with building operations, we enlarged the building and instead of rebuilding for two hundred seventy-five, which was the number of inmates in the burnt portions, we have provided for one hundred additional, or three hundred seventy-five. Our contract provides that this entire project must be completed not later than the 15th day of May, 1927, and that part designated as the rear dormitory, which is a part of this project, will be completed by the 15th of October, this year. This project is to be one of the best in the State. The building will be fireproof, and the plans were given most careful consideration, and I conferred with several of the Nation's competent authorities in reference to the building before preparing the working plans.

        After consulting with the Superintendent as to the urgent needs of the Hospital, I have advised as follows: (See letter of transmittal to Budget Bureau.)

Respectfully submitted,

CHAS. C. HOOK, Architect.


Page 17

STATISTICAL SUMMARY

        

Table No. 1

  Male Female Total
Patients remaining June 30, 1924 651 671 1,322
Admitted during last two years (insane) 565 471 1,036
Admitted during last two years (criminal insane) 78 6 84
Total number under treatment 1,294 1,148 2,442
Average daily population ---- ---- 1,474.5
Restored (insane) 61 84 145
Improved (insane) 327 174 501
Unimproved (insane) 19 30 49
Transferred (insane) 8 1 9
Not insane 2 0 2
Died (insane) 109 101 210
Discharged and transferred (criminal insane) 15 1 16
Died (criminal insane) 3 2 5
Total number discharged and dead 544 393 937
Per cent of deaths on number treated 8.6 8.8 8.7
Per cent of recoveries and improved of number admitted 68 54 61
Remaining June 30, 1926 750 755 1,505

        

Table No. 2

SHOWING THE NUMBER OF ADMISSIONS AND DISCHARGES (INCLUDING CURES, IMPROVED, UNIMPROVED AND DEATHS) FOR EACH YEAR SINCE THE OPENING OF THE HOSPITAL

Date Admissions Discharged Remaining
  Cured Improved Transferred Not Insane Unimproved Deaths Total  
1856 90 5 3 ---- ---- ---- 2 10 80
1857 96 15 10 ---- ---- 6 7 38 138
1858 57 26 7 ---- ---- 9 9 51 141
1859 83 22 11 ---- ---- 7 10 50 170
1860 76 23 22 ---- ---- 25 23 73 179
1861 61 21 4 ---- ---- 14 8 47 193
1862 44 17 2 ---- ---- 8 15 42 195
1863 41 9 4 ---- ---- 7 21 41 195
1864 40 14 7 ---- ---- 7 27 55 189
1865 41 9 1 ---- ---- 19 45 74 147
1866 65 15 4 ---- ---- 14 14 47 165
1867 85 13 5 ---- ---- 13 21 52 198
1868 72 18 7 ---- ---- 11 17 53 217
1869 27 7 3 ---- ---- 2 7 19 225
1870 27 7 4 ---- ---- 2 9 22 232
1871 44 9 5 ---- ---- 9 8 31 245
1872 43 14 9 ---- ---- 14 8 55 233
1873 50 17 6 ---- ---- 5 13 41 242
1874 44 13 8 ---- ---- 2 16 39 247
1875 42 16 5 ---- ---- 5 14 40 249
1876 44 11 6 ---- ---- 3 9 29 264
1877 52 13 8 ---- ---- 3 15 39 278
1878 42 14 11 ---- ---- 10 19 54 266

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Table No. 2--Continued

Date Admissions Discharged Remaining
  Cured Improved Transferred Not Insane Unimproved Deaths Total  
1879 45 14 4 ---- ---- 2 13 33 277
1880 56 17 7 ---- ---- 7 29 60 273
1881 49 10 3 ---- ---- 2 23 38 284
1882 50 16 5 ---- ---- 18 17 56 278
1883 53 17 43 ---- ---- 63 9 132 199
1884 106 27 16 ---- ---- 9 11 62 243
1885 97 41 12 ---- ---- 9 24 86 254
1886 95 17 36 ---- ---- 28 20 101 248
1887 74 17 2 ---- ---- 3 8 30 292
1888 80 37 14 ---- ---- 11 18 80 292
1889 93 52 9 ---- ---- 1 25 87 298
1890 75 30 17 ---- ---- 16 26 79 294
1891 88 45 10 ---- ---- 2 24 81 301
1892 93 57 12 ---- ---- 4 21 94 300
1893 97 46 17 ---- ---- ---- 28 91 288
1894 92 50 3 ---- ---- 3 19 75 305
1895 137 62 7 ---- ---- 4 41 114 328
1896 160 96 12 ---- 2 5 44 159 329
1897 182 99 10 ---- ---- 8 28 145 364
1898 190 115 6 ---- ---- 3 27 161 393
1899 169 105 4 ---- 2 4 53 168 390
1900 192 119 3 ---- ---- 1 31 154 424
1901 143 100 5 ---- ---- 1 41 147 420
1902 163 150 1 ---- 1 1 33 186 397
1903 141 55 10 ---- 8 4 28 105 433
1904 187 121 12 77 1 ---- 29 240 380
1905 151 15 2 29 4 8 16 77 454
1906 143 113 5 5 3 2 28 154 441
1907 208 11 6 3 6 4 45 75 574
1908 137 160 3 3 2 ---- 41 209 502
1909 237 6 2 1 3 5 43 60 677
1910 487 239 3 9 11 7 55 324 842
1911 336 31 2 13 8 5 64 123 1,055
1912 262 293 55 3 2 4 110 467 850
1913 324 41 2 6 ---- 9 69 127 1,057
1914 372 280 46 1 1 13 82 423 994
1915 316 5 25 4 ---- 4 77 115 1,195
1916 274 106 230 ---- ---- 6 90 432 1,037
1917 222 7 16 ---- ---- 3 79 105 1,154
1918 191 27 214 ---- ---- ---- 109 350 995
1919 245 2 48 ---- ---- 5 59 114 1,126
1920 182 8 209 1 ---- 1 51 270 1,069
1921 286 1 8 ---- ---- 2 73 84 1,253
1922 (7 months) 198 77 140 36 ---- 19 37 309 1,160
1922-1924 865 156 275 8 4 57 203 703 1,322
1924-1926 1,120 145 501 25 2 49 215 937 1,505
Totals 10,729 4,442 2,201 224 64 597 2,680 9,198 ----


Page 18a

        

Illustration


Page 19

        

Table No. 3

SHOWING FORM OF INSANITY OF THOSE ADMITTED DURING PAST TWO YEARS

  Male Female Total
Epilepsy 115 101 216
Dementia præcox 81 93 174
Manic depressive 61 117 178
Senile dementia 45 21 66
Psychoneurosis 2 10 12
Pellagra 2 4 6
Drug addict and alcoholism 190 43 233
Undiagnosed 10 3 13
Defective mental development 10 24 34
Exhaustive psychosis 0 1 1
Toxic psychosis 6 1 7
Constitutional psychopathic inferiority 7 1 8
Involutional melancholia 8 32 40
Syphilis 1 0 1
Paresis 6 1 7
Cerebral hemorrhage 1 0 1
Traumatic psychosis 3 1 4
Psychosis (type undetermined) 3 0 3
Encephalitis 3 1 4
Idiocy 2 1 3
Tabes 1 0 1
Huntington's chorea 2 0 2
Psychosis following influenza 3 0 3
Psychosis following paralysis 1 3 4
Diabetis melitus 1 0 1
Multiple sclerosis 0 1 1
Post infectious psychosis 0 1 1
Puerperal psychosis 0 5 5
Not insane 1 6 7
Totals 565 471 1,036

        

Table No. 4

SHOWING DURATION OF INSANITY OF THOSE ADMITTED DURING PAST TWO YEARS

  Male Female Total
Not to exceed 1 month 45 49 94
1 to 3 months 49 51 100
3 to 6 months 39 41 80
6 to 12 months 40 52 92
12 to 24 months 51 43 94
2 to 3 years 26 24 50
3 to 5 years 70 41 111
5 to 10 years 69 63 132
10 to 20 years 59 46 105
20 to 30 years 19 12 31
30 to 40 years 9 3 12
40 to 50 years 2 0 2
50 to 60 years 0 1 1
Unknown 87 45 132
Totals 565 471 1,036


Page 20

        

Table No. 5

SHOWING AGE WHEN ADMITTED OF THOSE ADMITTED DURING TWO YEARS

  Male Female Total
From 1 to 10 years 4 8 12
From 10 to 20 years 50 61 111
From 20 to 30 years 111 97 208
From 30 to 40 years 128 124 252
From 40 to 50 years 117 101 218
From 50 to 60 years 80 49 129
From 60 to 70 years 42 22 64
From 70 to 80 years 23 6 29
From 80 to 90 years 2 2 4
Unknown 8 1 9
Totals 565 471 1,036

        

Table No. 6

SHOWING CIVIL CONDITION OF THOSE ADMITTED DURING THE PAST TWO YEARS

  Male Female Total
Single 245 156 401
Married 265 258 523
Widowed 55 57 112
Totals 565 471 1,036

        

Table No. 7

SHOWING RESIDENCE OF THOSE ADMITTED DURING THE PAST TWO YEARS

  Male Female Total
Alamance 16 17 33
Alleghany 0 1 1
Alexander 3 0 3
Anson 3 1 4
Ashe 1 0 1
Avery 1 1 2
Beaufort 5 8 13
Bertie 0 2 2
Bladen 5 7 12
Brunswick 2 3 5
Buncombe 10 6 16
Burke 0 0 0
Cabarrus 7 3 10
Camden 0 2 2
Carteret 3 1 4
Caldwell 2 1 3
Caswell 2 8 10
Catawba 5 0 5
Chatham 4 7 11
Cherokee 4 0 4
Chowan 4 2 6
Columbus 4 6 10

Page 21

Table No. 7--(Continued)

  Male Female Total
Craven 3 5 8
Clay 0 0 0
Cleveland 2 1 3
Cumberland 15 19 34
Currituck 0 1 1
Davie 0 1 1
Davidson 5 0 5
Duplin 7 8 15
Dare 0 0 0
Durham 15 28 43
Edgecombe 16 7 23
Franklin 13 8 21
Forsyth 12 6 18
Gaston 7 9 16
Gates 0 0 0
Graham 0 0 0
Guilford 17 10 27
Granville 10 7 17
Greene 1 3 4
Halifax 15 8 23
Harnett 7 18 25
Henderson 11 2 13
Hertford 1 1 2
Hoke 1 3 4
Hyde 1 2 3
Iredell 0 2 2
Johnston 11 11 22
Jones 0 1 1
Jackson 1 0 1
Lee 4 8 12
Lenoir 15 9 24
Lincoln 0 0 0
Madison 2 1 3
Martin 3 0 3
Macon 1 2 3
McDowell 1 1 2
Mecklenburg 16 9 25
Mitchell 1 0 1
Montgomery 2 1 3
Moore 7 9 16
Nash 20 14 34
New Hanover 5 13 18
Northampton 6 4 10
Onslow 7 3 10
Orange 9 5 14
Pamlico 0 2 2
Pasquotank 4 2 6
Pender 2 3 5
Perquimans 1 1 2
Person 6 7 13
Pitt 15 4 19
Polk 0 1 1
Richmond 2 2 4
Randolph 0 1 1
Robeson 16 16 32
Rockingham 3 3 6
Rowan 3 2 5
Rutherford 4 2 6

Page 22

Table No. 7--(Continued)

  Male Female Total
Sampson 10 13 23
Scotland 8 4 12
Stanly 6 0 6
Stokes 0 0 0
Surry 5 1 6
Swain 2 3 5
Transylvania 1 0 1
Tyrrell 0 1 1
Union 2 3 5
Vance 9 11 20
Wake 69 39 108
Warren 6 4 10
Washington 3 1 4
Watauga 1 2 3
Wayne 15 7 22
Wilkes 1 3 4
Wilson 15 17 32
Yadkin 2 1 3
Yancey 2 0 2
Totals 565 471 1,036

        

Table No. 8

SHOWING NATIVITY OF THOSE ADMITTED DURING THE PAST TWO YEARS

  Male Female Total
North Carolina 565 462 1,027
Georgia 0 1 1
Virginia 0 2 2
West Virginia 0 1 1
New York 0 1 1
Pennsylvania 0 1 1
Wisconsin 0 1 1
England 0 2 2
Totals 565 471 1,036

        

Table No. 9

SHOWING FORM OF INSANITY OF THOSE RECOVERED

  Male Female Total
Manic-depressive insanity 5 40 45
Drug addict and alcoholism 56 36 92
Involutional melancholia 0 5 5
Psychoneurosis 0 2 2
Puerperal psychosis 0 1 1
Totals 61 84 145


Page 23

        

Table No. 10

SHOWING DURATION OF INSANITY OF THOSE RECOVERED DURING PAST TWO YEARS

  Male Female Total
1 to 3 months 2 0 2
3 to 6 months 9 7 16
6 to 12 months 19 18 37
1 to 3 years 30 59 89
3 to 5 years 1 0 1
Totals 61 84 145

        

Table No. 11

SHOWING CAUSE OF DEATH OF THOSE WHO DIED DURING THE PAST TWO YEARS

  Male Female Total
Pulmonary tuberculosis 4 18 22
Lobar pneumonia 7 2 9
Broncho pneumonia 5 10 15
Exhaustion from epilepsy 14 8 22
Cardio renal disease 6 10 16
Cerebral hemorrhage 5 0 5
Exhaustion from senile dementia 18 6 24
Exhaustion from manic-depressive insanity 5 2 7
Pellagra 6 6 12
Paresis 3 0 3
Suicide by cutting throat 1 0 1
Accidental scald 1 0 1
Valvular disease of heart 2 1 3
Organic heart disease 1 0 1
Exhaustion from involutional melancholia 1 4 5
Exhaustion from dementia præcox 0 5 5
Exhaustion from Huntington's chorea 1 0 1
Acute nephritis 0 1 1
Cancer of breast 0 1 1
Arterio sclerosis 5 3 8
Fractured femur 1 2 3
Endocarditis 2 0 2
Cerebro spinal syphilis 0 1 1
Septicemia 0 2 2
Congestion of lungs 2 0 2
Hepatic cirrhosis 1 0 1
Malignant hypertension 0 1 1
Myocarditis 0 1 1
Gastro enteritis 1 0 1
Diarrhea 1 2 3
Exhaustion from mental disease 4 9 13
Chronic alcoholism and hypothyroidism 1 0 1
Exhaustion from acute mania 0 1 1
Tabes dorsalis 1 0 1
General paralysis 1 0 1
Sarcoma 1 0 1
Herniotomy 1 0 1
Hemiplegia 0 1 1
Organic heart disease 1 0 1
Ulcer of stomach 1 0 1
Pneumonia and endocarditis 1 0 1

Page 24

Table No. 11--(Continued)

  Male Female Total
Interstitian nephritis 0 1 1
Influenza 1 0 1
Acute dilatation of heart 0 1 1
Hypostatic pneumonia 1 0 1
Cardio valvular disease 2 0 2
Apoplexy 0 2 2
Totals 109 101 210

        

Table No. 12

SHOWING FORM OF INSANITY OF THOSE WHO DIED DURING THE PAST TWO YEARS

  Male Female Total
Moron 1 0 1
Psychosis with Huntington's chorea 1 0 1
Defective mental development 0 2 2
Dementia præcox 5 17 22
Epilepsy 22 10 32
Involutional melancholia 3 15 18
Manic-depressive insanity 15 24 39
Cerebro spinal syphilis 0 1 1
Pellagra 2 3 5
Senile dementia 31 16 47
Paresis 5 0 5
Hemiplegia 0 1 1
Cerebral hemorrhage 2 0 2
Arterio sclerosis 1 1 2
Drug addict 1 1 2
Alcoholism 5 0 5
Tabes dorsalis 1 0 1
Imbecile 2 0 2
Undiagnosed 12 10 22
Totals 109 101 210

        

Table No. 13

SHOWING THE AGE AT DEATH OF THOSE WHO DIED DURING THE PAST TWO YEARS

  Male Female Total
From 10 to 20 years 5 5 10
From 20 to 30 years 7 11 18
From 30 to 40 years 6 12 18
From 40 to 50 years 20 17 37
From 50 to 60 years 23 20 43
From 60 to 70 years 25 21 46
From 70 to 80 years 22 11 33
From 80 to 90 years 1 4 5
Totals 109 101 210


Page 25

        

Table No. 14

SHOWING LENGTH OF TIME SPENT IN HOSPITAL OF THOSE WHO DIED DURING THE PAST TWO YEARS

  Male Female Total
Less than a week 2 3 5
From 1 to 4 weeks 21 19 40
From 1 to 3 months 9 4 13
From 3 to 6 months 7 7 14
From 6 to 12 months 14 7 21
From 1 to 3 years 21 17 38
From 3 to 5 years 9 5 14
From 5 to 10 years 6 14 20
From 10 to 15 years 13 11 24
From 15 to 20 years 3 7 10
From 20 to 30 years 4 5 9
From 30 to 40 years 0 1 1
From 40 to 50 years 0 1 1
Totals 109 101 210

        

Table No. 15

SHOWING RESIDENCE OF THOSE REMAINING IN HOSPITAL

  Male Female Total
Alamance 24 28 52
Alleghany 2 3 5
Alexander 2 3 5
Anson 3 2 5
Ashe 6 3 9
Avery 3 1 4
Beaufort 13 17 30
Bertie 4 15 19
Bladen 14 14 28
Burke 5 3 8
Brunswick 6 6 12
Buncombe 8 6 14
Cabarrus 5 3 8
Camden 1 2 3
Clay 2 0 2
Carteret 6 6 12
Caswell 7 9 16
Caldwell 1 3 4
Chatham 6 13 19
Chowan 5 2 7
Cleveland 1 1 2
Columbus 11 9 20
Cherokee 3 0 3
Craven 7 15 22
Cumberland 31 23 54
Currituck 3 3 6
Dare 3 3 6
Davie 3 2 5
Duplin 10 12 22
Davidson 5 0 5
Durham 23 30 53
Edgecombe 21 11 32

Page 26

Table No. 15--Continued

  Male Female Total
Franklin 15 18 33
Forsyth 5 5 10
Gates 2 0 2
Gaston 4 2 6
Guilford 12 13 25
Granville 15 16 31
Greene 7 8 15
Henderson 5 2 7
Halifax 15 15 30
Harnett 13 13 26
Hertford 3 4 7
Haywood 4 3 7
Hoke 2 9 11
Hyde 3 5 8
Iredell 7 6 13
Johnston 23 20 43
Jones 2 5 7
Jackson 1 0 1
Lee 3 11 14
Lenoir 10 13 23
Lincoln 1 1 2
Martin 8 7 15
Macon 2 4 6
McDowell 2 1 3
Moore 14 15 29
Mecklenburg 3 8 11
Montgomery 2 1 3
Madison 5 4 9
Mitchell 2 1 3
Nash 21 12 33
New Hanover 16 18 34
Northampton 15 6 21
Onslow 8 14 22
Orange 10 11 21
Pamlico 4 6 10
Pasquotank 15 5 20
Pender 6 5 11
Perquimans 3 4 7
Person 9 6 15
Polk 2 0 2
Pitt 7 16 23
Robeson 20 25 45
Rowan 6 3 9
Randolph 2 2 4
Rockingham 3 6 9
Richmond 4 6 10
Rutherford 1 2 3
Sampson 15 15 30
Stanly 4 1 5
Scotland 8 9 17
Surry 6 1 7
Stokes 5 3 8
Tyrrell 1 2 3
Transylvania 3 1 4
Union 1 4 5
Vance 10 4 14
Wake 54 53 107


Page 26a

        

Illustration

[Drug Room]


Page 27

        

Table No. 15--Continued

  Male Female Total
Warren 10 8 18
Washington 4 0 4
Wayne 20 24 44
Watauga 1 4 5
Wilson 12 15 27
Wilkes 5 2 7
Yancey 4 2 6
Yadkin 1 2 3
Totals 750 755 1,505

        

Table No. 16

APPLICATIONS ON FILE

  Insane Epileptic  
Male Female Male Female Total
Alamance 20 19 ---- ---- 39
Alexander ---- ---- 2 1 3
Anson 1 1 ---- 2 4
Avery ---- ---- 2 ---- 2
Ashe ---- ---- 1 ---- 1
Beaufort 8 8 1 1 18
Bertie 4 2 2 ---- 8
Bladen 15 11 1 ---- 27
Brunswick 3 7 ---- 1 11
Buncombe 5 1 5 ---- 11
Burke 1 1 2 1 5
Cabarrus 1 ---- 4 2 7
Caldwell 1 ---- 3 3 7
Camden ---- 3 ---- ---- 3
Carteret 5 9 2 ---- 16
Caswell 7 10 2 ---- 19
Catawba 1 ---- 1 ---- 2
Chatham 5 17 1 ---- 23
Cherokee ---- ---- 1 2 3
Chowan 2 3 ---- ---- 5
Clay ---- ---- ---- 1 1
Cleveland ---- ---- ---- 2 2
Columbus 7 14 5 ---- 26
Craven 8 8 ---- ---- 16
Cumberland 25 24 5 1 55
Currituck ---- 6 1 ---- 7
Dare 4 ---- ---- 1 5
Davidson ---- ---- 2 ---- 2
Davie ---- ---- 3 2 5
Duplin 14 10 1 ---- 25
Durham 28 36 2 2 68
Edgecombe 8 11 4 1 24
Forsyth 2 7 6 ---- 15
Franklin 11 10 ---- 3 24
Gaston 6 2 4 3 15
Gates 2 4 ---- ---- 6

Page 28

Table No. 16--Continued

  Insane Epileptic  
Male Female Male Female Total
Granville 21 14 2 ---- 37
Greene 3 8 ---- ---- 11
Guilford 11 3 10 2 26
Halifax 16 9 ---- 1 26
Harnett 15 18 1 ---- 34
Haywood ---- ---- 2 2 4
Henderson ---- ---- 4 ---- 4
Hertford 1 4 ---- ---- 5
Hoke 7 4 2 1 14
Hyde 2 3 ---- 2 7
Iredell ---- 2 3 2 7
Jackson ---- ---- 4 ---- 4
Johnston 12 20 4 2 38
Jones 3 1 ---- ---- 4
Lee 9 10 ---- ---- 19
Lenoir 14 10 3 ---- 27
Lincoln ---- ---- 1 ---- 1
Macon ---- ---- 1 3 4
Madison ---- ---- 4 1 5
Martin 6 3 ---- ---- 9
Mecklenburg 11 2 8 3 24
McDowell 2 1 2 2 7
Mitchell ---- ---- 2 2 4
Montgomery ---- ---- 4 1 5
Moore 7 17 4 1 29
Nash 8 16 1 ---- 25
New Hanover 16 15 ---- ---- 31
Northampton 6 6 ---- ---- 12
Onslow 6 2 ---- ---- 8
Orange 16 9 ---- ---- 25
Pamlico 5 2 ---- ---- 7
Pasquotank 4 6 ---- ---- 10
Pender 6 8 ---- ---- 14
Perquimans 6 6 ---- ---- 12
Person 7 13 ---- ---- 20
Pitt 13 14 2 1 30
Polk ---- ---- 1 1 2
Randolph ---- ---- 2 1 3
Richmond ---- ---- 1 2 3
Robeson 21 18 3 2 44
Rockingham 1 ---- 2 4 7
Rowan 1 ---- 6 1 8
Sampson 13 11 1 ---- 25
Scotland 9 7 ---- ---- 16
Stanly ---- ---- 3 ---- 3
Stokes ---- ---- 5 1 6
Surry ---- ---- 4 3 7
Swain ---- ---- 1 3 4
Tyrrell ---- ---- 1 ---- 1
Union 1 ---- 6 3 10
Vance 8 ---- 13 ---- 21
Wake 29 33 2 2 66
Warren 8 4 ---- ---- 12
Washington 4 6 ---- ---- 10
Watauga ---- ---- 4 2 6

Page 29

Table No. 16--Continued

  Insane Epileptic  
Male Female Male Female Total
Wayne 18 17 2 2 39
Wilkes ---- ---- 9 ---- 9
Wilson 11 9 3 ---- 23
Yancey ---- ---- ---- 3 3
Yadkin ---- ---- 1 ---- 1
Totals 551 555 197 85 1,388

DR. ALBERT ANDERSON, Superintendent, State Hospital, Raleigh, N. C.

        SIR:--In accordance with the usual custom I am transmitting to you Biennial Reports from the heads of the various activities of the institution who operate under the supervision of the Steward:

  • Farm, Garden and Dairy, James Adams, Superintendent.
  • Engineering Department, T. A. Holiday, Chief Engineer.
  • Carpenter's Department, R. M. Brown, Head Carpenter.
  • Housekeeping, M. R. Hall, Matron.
  • Clothing, Mrs. Josephine Thomas, Clothing Supervisor.
  • Art Room and Cabinet Shop, Work done by Patients, Ella Thompson and Etta Travis, Directors.

        A combined report of the audit had of the accounts for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1926, is also submitted.

        Budget Requests for Maintenance and Permanent Improvement Appropriations for the Biennium, beginning July 1, 1927, and ending June 30, 1929, follow the report of audit.

Respectfully submitted,

(Signed) MARY S. WHITE, Stewardess.

MISS MARY S. WHITE, Stewardess, State Hospital, Raleigh, N. C.

        MADAM:--I hereby submit a summary of the past two years, ending June 30th, 1926:

        The crops have been up to the average.

        The roads have been hard-surfaced three and a half miles. One more mile would complete our roadways.

        The dairy has supplied the Hospital with one hundred and fifty gallons of milk per day.

Respectfully submitted,

JAMES ADAMS, Supervisor.



Page 30

        

REPORT OF FARM AND DAIRY PRODUCTS For Year Ending June 30th, 1925

  Quantity Price Amount
Apples 185 bushels @ $ 1.25 $ 231.25
Canned apples 254 dozen @ 6.00 1,524.00
Beans, green lima 198 bushels @ 3.20 633.60
Beans, dry lima 43 bushels @ 3.00 129.00
Beans, snap 432 bushels @ 1.00 432.00
Canned beans 482 dozen @ 6.00 2,892.00
Beef 7,200 pounds @ .10½ 756.00
Beets 623 bushels @ .60 373.80
Cabbage 40,565 heads @ .08 3,245.20
Collards 16,890 heads @ .06 1,013.40
Carrots 25 bushels @ 1.00 25.00
Cantaloupes 11,500 each @ .03 345.00
Cucumbers 160 bushels @ 1.00 160.00
Chickens 750 pounds @ .25 187.50
Broilers 539 pounds @ .35 188.65
Eggs 2,298 dozen @ .30 689.40
Grapes 85 bushels @ 1.25 106.25
Leeks 25 bushels @ 1.00 25.00
Milk 59,511 gallons @ .40 23,804.40
Okra 133 bushels @ .90 119.70
Onions 275 bushels @ 1.00 275.00
Peas, dry 373 bushels @ 3.00 1,119.00
Peas, English 125 bushels @ 3.20 400.00
Peas, green 162 bushels @ 3.20 518.40
Peaches 325 bushels @ 1.50 487.50
Canned peaches 62 @ 7.00 434.00
Pork 38,522 pounds @ .15 5,778.30
Potatoes, sweet 4,500 bushels @ 1.50 6,750.00
Potatoes, Irish 1,200 bushels @ 1.50 1,800.00
Radishes 61 bushels @ 1.00 61.00
Roasting ears 1,875 dozen @ .25 468.75
Salads 2.375 bushels @ .75 1,781.25
Salsify 62 bushels @ 1.00 62.00
Squash 615 bushels @ .85 522.75
Squabs 35 pairs @ 1.00 35.00
Strawberries 2,064 quarts @ .15 309.60
Tomatoes 413 bushels @ 1.00 413.00
Turnips 1,500 bushels @ 1.00 1,500.00
Watermelons 3,225 each @ .10 322.50
Corn 5,438 bushels @ 1.50 8,157.00
Corn, ensilage 415 tons @ 3.50 1,452.50
Corn, stover 125 tons @ 10.00 1,250.00
Hay 325 tons @ 25.00 8,125.00
Wheat 2,020 bushels @ 1.25 2,525.00
Wheat straw 40 tons @ 10.00 400.00
Manure 650 loads @ 2.00 1,300.00
Wool 325 pounds @ .30 97.50
Sales     806.50
      $ 84,032.70


Page 31

        

REPORT OF FARM AND DAIRY PRODUCTS For Year Ending June 30th, 1926

  Quantity Price Total
Apples 428 bushels @ $ 1.25 $ 535.00
Snap beans 722 bushels @ 1.50 1,083.00
Lima beans (green) 235 bushels @ 3.20 752.00
Lima beans (dry) 50 bushels @ 3.00 150.00
Beef 8,966 pounds @ .10½ 941.43
Beets 580 bushels @ .60 348.00
Corn 8,500 bushels @ 1.00 8,500.00
Cabbage 25,820 heads @ .10 2,582.00
Collards 20,000 heads @ .08 1,600.00
Corn ensilage 430 tons @ 3.50 1,505.00
Corn stover 123 tons @ 10.00 1,230.00
Carrots 18 bushels @ 1.00 18.00
Cantaloupes 7,500 @ .03 225.00
Cucumbers 150 bushels @ .75 112.50
Chickens 294 pounds @ .25 73.50
Spring chickens 385 pounds @ .35 134.75
Eggs 1,999 dozen @ .35 699.65
Fodder 10 tons @ 25.00 6,250.00
Grapes 92 bushels @ 1.25 115.00
Hay 250 tons @ 25.00 6,250.00
Leeks 185 bushels @ 1.00 186.00
Milk 66,348 gallons @ .60 39,808.80
Okra 87 bushels @ .90 78.30
Oats 1,200 bushels @ .80 960.00
Onions 335 bushels @ 1.00 335.00
Onion sets 30 bushels @ 4.00 120.00
Peas (dry) 385 bushels @ 3.50 1,347.50
Peas, English 150 bushels @ 3.20 480.00
Peas (green) 163 bushels @ 3.20 521.60
Peaches 412 bushels @ 1.25 515.00
Pork 35,000 pounds @ .15 5,250.00
Potatoes, sweet 36,000 bushels @ 1.50 5,400.00
Potatoes, Irish 1,525 bushels @ 1.00 1,525.00
Roasting ears 2,300 dozen @ .25 575.00
Salad 2,980 bushels @ .60 1,788.00
Squash 575 bushels @ .80 460.00
Squabs 50 pairs @ 1.00 50.00
Strawberries 1,800 quarts @ .15 270.00
Tomatoes 575 bushels @ 1.00 575.00
Turnips 635 bushels @ .60 381.00
Wheat 1,425 bushels @ 1.25 1,781.25
Wheat straw 30 tons @ 10.00 300.00
Watermelons 3,980 @ .10 398.00
Wood 150 cords @ 5.00 750.00
Wool 240 pounds @ .40 96.00
Manure 1,200 loads @ 2.00 2,400.00
Lettuce 875 heads @ .05 43.75
      $93,500.03

    Sales:

    Sale of hides and livestock$ 65.41
    Sale of wood342.50
    Empty sacks36.00
    Slaughtering cow75.00
     518.91


Page 32

DEPARTMENT REPORTS

REPORT OF ENGINEER

MISS MARY S. WHITE, Stewardess, State Hospital, Raleigh, N. C.

        MADAM:--I hereby submit a report of the work done in the Engineering Department for two years, ending June 30th, 1926:

        We have, besides keeping up the regular repairs, made the following improvements:

        Connected four cottages with the lighting system and water and connected same to the city sewer, and run a storm sewer to the branch.

        Have run a telephone line under ground from the Superintendent's residence to the gate-keeper's cottage.

        We have installed two closets in courtyard at Male Epileptic Colony, using 300 feet of 1¼ in. galvanized pipe and 500 feet of 4-in. terracotta.

        We have made a new connection to the water main, taking out the old 2-in. connection and putting in a 4-in. connection. This will give a good supply of water to all fixtures.

        We have repaired electric and telephone lines to colonies, and put up new poles at railroad crossing, raising the wires thirty-eight feet above the rails.

        We have installed new drinking cups in the dairy and have had new tubes put in boiler at same.

        We have taken out the old Jones stokers from boilers Nos. 1, 2 and 3 and rebuilt the firebox for hand-firing; and have dismantled boilers Nos. 4, 5 and 6, and taken them out and cut them up for junk. Have cleared out the old foundation ready for new work.

        We have changed the steam connection on No. 3 boiler from high pressure to the 40-pound line and have put in the heating system until the new boilers are ready. This old boiler was loaned by Dillon Supply Company.

        We have remodeled the heating system in the greenhouse and installed a cellar drain in the pit to keep out the water.

        We have moved the water main and telephone line poles out of the way of the annex to the Criminal Insane Building and have run a storm sewer under the railroad to take the water away from this building. We have had to change the electric line also for this building.

        Two new boilers have been installed in the boiler room, 250 h. p. each. These boilers were fired up and put in use December 25th, 1925. Everything was working fine until I got oil in the new boilers and burned out twelve tubes in No. 3, No. 4 and No. 5 boilers; this was caused by too much oil being fed to the cylinders of the engine. These tubes were replaced and I have kept them clean ever since.


Page 33

        We have installed a pair of scales for weighing coal and ashes in boiler room; also a cellar drain to keep the water out of the scale pit.

        We have installed a new mill of the hammer type for grinding our grain.

        We have installed a transformer of 5 K. W. in a pit back of the Superintendent's residence, and run a cable from the Hospital Building to this transformer. This was to get better service for electric range.

        We have made eccentric rod for No. 2 power engine and new piston rings for boiler feed pumps.

        We have installed in laundry a humatic extractor and a copper starch cooker.

        We have installed in pump room, on receiving tank, a copper regulating valve. This lets in city water when it is needed only.

        We have put up a new electric line feeding D, E, and F wards, the old line being torn down.

        On April 10th, 1926, we had a fire which destroyed six wards of the Main Building and four wards that were built during Dr. Kirby's administration, and stopped at a wall of the Underwood Building built during Dr. Jas. McKee's administration. On the back side of the old building, the dormitory and old dining hall and toilets for six wards were destroyed. This was built by Underwood and was built during Dr. McKee's administration.

        After the fire, which put all of our steam, hot and cold water lines out of use on the male side, we made a temporary steam connection, using 400 feet of 2-in. black pipe and 200 feet 1½-in. black pipe. We then connected our hot water heating system to domestic hot water system, but it did not last long and had to be changed.

        We have put new water end on No. 2 boiler feed pump and new piston rods on same.

        We have unloaded 245 cars of coal.

        We have made and given out 1,022,000 pounds of ice.

        Made and put up railing at Steward's residence.

        We have repaired brine line in refrigerating plant.

Respectfully submitted,

T. A. HOLLIDAY, Engineer.

MISS MARY S. WHITE, Stewardess, State Hospital, Raleigh, N. C.

        MADAM:--I respectfully submit to you the record of work done in the Carpenter Department from June 30th, 1924, to June 30th, 1926:

        Laid maple floors in First and Fourth Ward. Laid and varnished floor in First Ward. Painted interior of Receiving Building. Shoeing horses and mules during year of 1925. Completed finishing work at Superintendent's residence. Painted Colony and Doctor's residence two coats. Converted back porch at Gate Keeper's cottage into room.


Page 34

        Laid cement walk, built brick wall and partition around pump. Laid cement floor in basement at Twelfth Ward. Laid concrete runway at Laundry. Built partition for two bathrooms. Laid oak floor in room and two bathrooms in second floor in Center Building.

        Erected 500 feet shelving in clothes rooms and painted eight rooms at Female Colony. Built cement steps and walk at Colony and Doctor's residence. Built forms for wall and poured same at Boylan Bridge.

        Assisted with cyclone fence at G-Ward, Male and Female Colony. Cut opening and hung door in Bakery. Laid concrete walk in front of Female Colony. Built shelters in Male and Female Epileptic courtyard 24×50. Covered same with rubber roofing. Built 120 feet lattice fence at G-Ward courtyard. Erected 2,000 feet shelving in storeroom. Built four cottages on Boylan Drive with four rooms and bath and covered same with composition shingles.

        Ceiled two strong rooms on A-Ward. Put up 1,000 feet chair rail at Hospital Building. Made 125 foot benches for G-Ward courtyard.

        Made forms and poured concrete bridge at South Street entrance.

        Sanded and varnished second floor at Center Building. Laid 5,000 feet rift pine flooring at Female Epileptic Colony. Painted tin roof at wheat barn. Sanded and varnished six floors in Center Building. Laid 3,200 feet rift pine flooring at Oaks Colony. Built shelving in clothes room at Female T. B. Cut out two openings and fitted and hung doors at Hospital Building. Built forms and poured concrete bridge at Boylan Bridge. Put new locks on First, Second, Fourth and Fifth Wards. Made concrete forms and poured cement foundation walls at Steward's residence. Patients dug out basement.

        Built rim and wired inside corn crib. Laid concrete walk and gutter at west end of Nurses's Home. Ceiled strong room at Female Colony. Built two huts for female patients eight feet square. Assisted with erection of cyclone fence between bridge and Nurses' Home. Put up beaver board in room of kitchen employees. Varnished cork floor in Female Dining Room. Painted interior of Nurses' Home. Sanded and varnished floors.

        Built arria wall and steps at Steward's residence. Painted window and door at Boiler House. Built room and porch at Dr. Brackin's cottage. Covered same with composition shingles. Laid pine floor in upper hall. Sanded and varnished same at Colony and Doctor's residence. Made desk for Male Colony.

        Made necessary repairs on female wards caused by damage at time of fire. (Mr. Davidson's men assisted in this work.) Cut down cabinet lockers at Nurses' Home. Put 350 feet sand-screen wire on ventilators on roof at Boiler Room. Built concrete transformer pit at Superintendent's residence. Built double brick garage at Steward's residence. Made six heavy screen doors for Dairy Barn. Built elevator frame in coal bin. Took down roof on Eleventh Ward that was burned to make ready for new building.


Page 34a

        

Illustration

Dental Office and X-Ray Lab


Page 35

        Laid concrete floor in basement adjoining G-Ward. Hung double doors on porch and also made two screen doors for Nurses' Home. Repairs to wagons. Locks repaired; glass on wards; chairs repaired; mattresses sterilized and made. The chair and mattress work is done by patients.

Respectfully submitted,

R. M. BROWN.

REPORT OF MATRON

MISS MARY S. WHITE, Stewardess, State Hospital, Raleigh, N. C.

        MADAM:--I hereby respectfully submit to you a report of the work done in the Matron's Department from June 30th, 1924, to June 30th, 1926:

        We have, besides keeping up the regular daily duties of the Kitchen, Bakery and Center Building, made the following:

        
  1925 1926 Total
Butter 7,521 pounds 6,438 pounds 13,959 pounds
Lard 4,264 pounds 4,290 pounds 8,554 pounds
Strawberry preserves 68 gallons gallons 68 gallons
Plum jelly 28 gallons gallons 28 gallons
Peach preserves 202 gallons 246 gallons 448 gallons
Grape jelly 34 gallons 54 gallons 88 gallons
Peach pickle 45 gallons 48 gallons 93 gallons
Apple jelly 18½ gallons 68 gallons 86½ gallons
Watermelon rind preserves 30 gallons 128 gallons 158 gallons
Watermelon rind pickle 37 gallons 98 gallons 135 gallons
Pear preserves 235 gallons 128 gallons 363 gallons
Grape preserves 25 gallons 48 gallons 73 gallons
Apple preserves 18 gallons gallons 18 gallons
Cucumber pickle 60 gallons gallons 60 gallons
Tomato pickle gallons 48 gallons 48 gallons
Pear sweet pickle gallons 25 gallons 25 gallons
Cucumbers in brine 20 barrels barrles 20 barrels
Beans 5,789 gallons 5,438 gallons 11,277 gallons
Apples 3,050 gallons 718 gallons 3,768 gallons
Peaches 739 gallons 88 gallons 827 gallons
Pears 1,245 gallons 333 gallons 1,578 gallons
Tomatoes 211 gallons 2,060 gallons 2,271 gallons
Okra gallons 285 gallons 285 gallons

        With the aid of patients in the spring of 1925 we painted the entire Kitchen, including the five Dining Rooms in Kitchen, Vegetable Room and Diet Kitchen. In the spring of 1925 we painted the Meat Room, Broom Room, Vegetable Room, Supply Room, Diet Kitchen and varnished all the furniture, office fixtures and chairs in Center Building, also painted and enameled all beds in Center Building.

Respectfully submitted,

M. R. HALL, Matron.


Page 36

REPORT OF CLOTHES SUPERVISOR

MISS MARY S. WHITE, Stewardess, State Hospital, Raleigh, N. C.

        MADAM:--I hereby respectfully submit to you a report of the work done in this department from June 30th, 1924, to June 30th, 1926:

        

  • Total number of pieces mended...................................83,646
  • Total number of pieces marked..................................191,957
  • Total number of bandage made......................................7,343
  • Total number of shoes mended, pairs............................2,741
  • Total number of pieces mended at Female Colony....19,424
  • Average number of patients in mending room....................16
  • Average number of patients in sewing room.......................22
  • Average number of patients in laundry.................................34
  • Average number of employees in laundry...........................14
  • One employee in mending room
  • One employee in sewing room

        

GARMENTS MADE:

Awnings 2
Auto seat covers 3
Aprons, ladies' 260
Aprons, servants' 713
Aprons, butchers' 6
Aprons, bakers' 40
Aprons, chefs' 140
Aprons, maid 12
Aprons, bungalow ----
Burial robes 107
Baby dresses 4
Bonnets 4
Bags, clothes 590
Bags, sand 3
Bags, ice 24
Bath robes 20
Caps, nurses' 143
Caps, maids' 6
Caps, chefs' 29
Coats, white 46
Coats, lining 1
Curtains, long 510
Curtains, short 1,025
Coffee strainers 36
Covers, chair 29
Covers, mattress 40
Covers, basket 4
Covers, pillow 21
Covers, blanket 1
Covers, broom 6
Chemise, unbleached 2,420
Dresses, gingham 2,574
Chemise, bleached 144
Dresses, cheviot 1,300
Dresses, strong 1,089
Dresses, flannel 33
Dresser scarfs 28
Drawers, ladies' (unbleached) 662
Drawers, ladies' (bleached) 66
Drawers, men's 1,725
Gowns, long 265
Gowns, short 931


Page 37

GARMENTS MADE--Continued

Gloves, canvass, pairs 4
Garters 640
Many-tail bandage 6
Mattress ticks 2,670
Napkins 81
Overalls 1,421
Princess slips 359
Pillow ticks 1,356
Pillow cases (bleached) 298
Pillow cases (unbleached) 4,168
Petticoats, outing 99
Petticoats, bleaching 52
Petticoats, baby 2
Pants, white 137
Pants, work 808
Pan holders 66
Rompers, men's 309
Rompers, boys' 112
Straight jackets 9
Sheets 6,186
Sheets, bleached 202
Screen curtains 4
Shower curtains 4
Shirts, work 3,269
Shirts, dress 605
Shirts, under 350
Strainer, jelly 7
Towels, dish 952
Towels, roller 60
Table cloths 34
Tags, hosiery 121
Underbodies 8
Window draperies 114
Garments altered 52
Total number of pieces made 39,627

GARMENTS CUT FOR SEWING ROOM AT FEMALE COLONY:

Aprons, ladies' 20
Aprons, servants' 31
Bonnets 3
Curtains, short 8
Curtains, long 16
Chemise 169
Children's petticoats 6
Children's drawers 2
Dresses, gingham 229
Dresses, cheviot 60
Dresses, strong 27
Dresser scarfs 22
Drawers, ladies' 118
Drawers, men's 506
Gowns, long 539
Gowns, short 277
Girls' rompers 6
Laundry bags 38
Mattress covers 12
Mattress ticks 287
Overalls 503
Princess slips 24
Petticoats, domestic 76

Page 38

GARMENTS CUT FOR SEWING ROOM AT FEMALE COLONY--Continued

Pants, work 123
Pillow cases 138
Rompers, men's 130
Sheets 400
Table cloths 1
Towels, dish 24
Underbodies 9
Work shirts 1,090
Total 4,894

NUMBER OF YARDS OF MATERIAL CUT:

Bleaching 2,828
Bed ticking 19,843¼
Crash 69
Canvass 404
Canton flannel 1,497
Cotton flannel 945
Cretonne 193¾
Chambry 12,838
Cheviot 9,358
Cottonade 6,429
Denims 13,149
Duck 381
Drilling 6,398
Domestic 20,680
Damask, table 141
Elastic 252
Flannel, wool 97
Gingham 12,085
Indian head 31
Percale 1,831
Shantung 19
Sheeting, bleached 433
Sheeting, unbleached 20,056
Sateen 543
Scrim 353
Toweling 811
Tubing, pillow 206
Total 131,871

GOODS SENT TO PATIENTS FROM HOME, CUT AND MADE IN SEWING ROOM:

Aprons, ladies' 18
Baby dress 1
Bonnets 2
Blouses 2
Corset covers 2
Camisole 1
Chemise 13
Dresses 133
Drawers, ladies 30
Gowns, long 24
Gowns, short 2
Garters, pairs 1
Kimonas 2
Petticoats 9
Princess slips 51
Teddies 23
Total 314

Page 39

PRIVATE MATERIALS (YARDS):

Bleaching 88½
Broadcloth, silk 3
Crepe, cotton 54¾
Crepe de chine 4
Canton flannel
Calton plaid
Dimity 23
Domestic 183¼
Elastic 1
Flanned, white 3
Foulard 8
Gingham 391¼
Indian head 12
Jersey tubing 4
Long cloth 148¼
Linen
Madras 22½
Outing 33
Plaid, flannel 4
Percale 112
Poplin 10
Rice cloth 4
Sateen 18
Silk, wash
Satin 3
Shantung 5
Taffeta 8
Voile 57½
Total 1,228¼

MRS. JOSEPHINE THOMAS,
Clothes Supervisor.

REPORT OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY DEPARTMENTS

MISS MARY S. WHITE, Stewardess, State Hospital, Raleigh, N. C.

        MADAM:--We hereby submit to you the biennial report of the Occupational Therapy Departments, male and female:

        
FEMALE DEPARTMENT: No. of Articles Made
Aprons, child's, embroidered 87
Aprons, ladies', embroidered 124
Aprons, laides', hemmed 211
Broom holder, raffia 9
Boudoir caps, embroidered 8
Baby's bedquilt, tufted 1
Baby's bedquilt, embroidered 1
Baby's kimona, embroidered 1
Baby's sack, embroidered 1
Baby's cap, crocheted 4
Baby's slip, embroidered 1
Baby's bib, embroidered 36
Baby's bibs, with crochet 6
Bird cages of soda straws 61


Page 40

FEMALE DEPARTMENT--Continued No. of Articles Made
Bedquilt, patchwork 4
Baby baskets, reed 15
Baby baskets, lined 15
Baskets, reed, large 22
Baskets, reed, small 31
Baskets, waste 22
Baskets, flower 35
Baskets, fruit 7
Baskets, raffia 5
Baskets, pine needle 4
Baskets, reed, doll 6
Bag, laundry, embroidered 12
Bag, canvass and raffia 1
Curtains, appliqued 2
Curtains, hemstitched 24
Curtains, embroidered 4
Cats, rag 5
Centerpieces, embroidered 36
Centerpieces, with crochet 112
Centerpieces, appliqued 2
Centerpieces, with tatting 6
Chairbacks, embroidered 6
Costume, party 2
Crocheted centerpiece 1
Crocheted inserts 13
Doll bed sheets 2
Doll bed spread 1
Doll bed pillow case 1
Doilies with tatting 31
Doilies with crochet 125
Doilies, hemstitched 62
Dolls, rag 5
Doilies, picoted 8
Dolls dressed 8
Doilies, embroidered 40
Dogs, rag 7
Flowers, paper 129
Flowers, waxed 129
Gown with crochet 1
Gown with tatting 1
Handkerchiefs, hemstitched 22
Handkerchiefs, with tatting 19
Hamper, reed 1
Lace, crocheted (yards) 97
Luncheon set, embroidered (pieces) 223
Luncheon set, with crochet (pieces) 416
Luncheon set, with tatting (pieces) 7
Luncheon set, hemstitched 156
Lampshade base, reed 1
Lampshade, lined 1
Masks, face 125
Medallions, crocheted 229
Medallions, tatting 155
Napkins, hemstitched 94
Napkins, embroidered 36
Napkins, hemmed 123
Napkins, picoted 79
Pillow cases, hemstitched 16
Pillow cases, embroidered 50
Pillow cases, with crochet 43


Page 41

FEMALE DEPARTMENT--Continued
Pillow cases, hemmed 49
Pillow cases, with tatting 46
Pillows, sofa 13
Pillow tops, embroidered 16
Pillow tops, handpainted 4
Pin cushions 8
Rugs, braided 32
Rugs, hooked 53
Rugs, woven 132
Rugs, crocheted 9
Rugs, repaired 1
Scarfs, hemstitched 293
Scarfs, with crochet 56
Scarfs, with tatting 19
Scarfs, embroidered 100
Sunbonnets, small 10
Towels, hemstitched 118
Towels, embroidered 93
Towels, with crochet 72
Towels, hemmed 78
Towels, with tatting 6
Trays, pine needle 2
Trays, reed, serving 40
Trays, with glass 13
Trays, handpainted 12
Trays, coaster 29
Table cloths, hemstitched 2
Table cloths, appliqued 1
Table cloths, embroidered 15
Tatting edge (yards) 230
Tatting insertion (yards) 5
Vases, reed 87
Total 5,030

MALE DEPARTMENT: No. of Articles Made
Baskets, waste 19
Baskets, medicine 3
Baskets, small souvenir 88
Baskets, large 31
Baskets, varnished 241
Boxes, plain wooden 3
Boxes, cedar, small 7
Boxes, window 31
Boxes, window, painted 31
Boxes, knife, wooden 2
Boxes, knife, reed 4
Bookcase, of spools 1
Bread board 1
Butter molds 3
Brooms (made since April 10, 1926; prior to this date did not make them in this Dept.) 1,040
Brooms, whisk 150
Brooms, round 76
Chairs, caned 513
Chairs, painted 205
Chairs, varnished 196
Doll bedstead 1
Ferris wheel 1
Fernery, reed (painted) 1
Hose reels 2


Page 42

MALE DEPARTMENT--Continued No. of Articles Made
Hampers, reed 4
Lampshades, reed 16
Lamp bases, reed 8
Lamp bases, varnished 8
Lampshades, varnished 16
Mattresses made 1,135
Napkin rings, reed 116
Napkin rings, varnished 73
Pillows made 236
Picture frames 36
Reed toy sunshades 45
Reed toy sunshades, varnished 31
Reed serving trays 13
Rugs, woven 30
Rolling pins 3
Repairs reed table 1
Repaired loom 1
Repaired rug frame 1
Repaired mat frame 1
Repaired milk churn 1
Repaired hinges on cedar chest 1
Repaired clocks 8
Screen, three panel 1
Screen, painted 1
Settee caned 2
Settee cushions 2
Settee cover 2
Settee sofa pillows 2
Settee painted 1
Stools caned, small 137
Stools caned, large 23
Stools, frames 160
Stools varnished 106
Stools painted 49
Tables, card (wood) 3
Tables, cedar 1
Tree racks 3
Total 4,928
Total number of articles made in Male Department 4,928
Total number of articles made in Female Department 5,030
Grand total 9,958
Entertainments given 6

Respectfully,

ELLA N. THOMPSON,
ETTA TRAVIS.


Page 42a

        

Illustration

Arts and Crafts Dept.