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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with George Wallace, July 15, 1974. Interview A-0024. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Wallace's views are rehabilitated in the 1970s

Wallace notes that the policy suggestions for which he was reviled in 1968 have reemerged in the 1970s and are finding significant support across the country.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with George Wallace, July 15, 1974. Interview A-0024. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

WALTER DE VRIES:
You're saying you really haven't lost touch with that group and they still identify with you. That for other politicians, they have lost touch and people don't identify with them any more?
GOV. GEORGE WALLACE:
Many of them. But have you noticed in the last few years how many of them are swinging back to saying exactly what we say? Don't you hear people running for the mayorship of Los Angeles and Atlanta, both races, saying we must have law and order and if you'll elect me I'll make it safe to walk on the streets. But when I was raising that issue in '68 they called it something evil. Said it was demogogic. And now, . . . when I talked about the urban welfare mess in '68, Humphrey called it demogogic. For instance. And yet the first thing he said in '72 in Florida was he wanted to get the welfare chisellers and loafers off the welfare rolls. And on the matter of busing. You find the busing bills have been introduced by people like Senators from Michigan and people from the state of New York, not Alabama.