Documenting the American South Logo
oral histories of the American South
Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Margaret Carter, October 25, 1975. Interview A-0309-1. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Courtship and marriage

Carter describes how she met her husband. Because he was still in law school, they prolonged their courtship and did not marry for several years.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Margaret Carter, October 25, 1975. Interview A-0309-1. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

We were quite active in the Baptist Church, which is where I met my husband. He expected to become a Baptist minister until he went to Baylor University and began to realize what was involved in being a minister in the Southern Convention and decided that his outlook was already too broad to permit him to have a successful career in the Southern Convention. So, he took a long summer off, went to West Texas and thought about it and decided that the thing he needed to do was to become a lawyer instead. We were already engaged and when he came back after that long exile, he said, "I'm going to become a lawyer," and I had to decide whether I wanted to marry a minister or marry him. It didn't take me long to decide that I wanted to marry him, although that wasn't easy because it didn't occur to us then that people got married before they were ready to support themselves and sustain a home. That meant that he had another long period of professional education ahead of him. After thinking it over for a few days, I said, "Yes, I think that it is all right. I would still like to marry you if you still want me. I wouldn't mind so much being married to a lawyer as long as you don't go into politics." [Laughter] Then, he did go into politics. [Laughter] With my enthusiastic support and after awhile, he became discouraged and I never have.
CHANDLER DAVIDSON:
When were you married?
MARGARET CARTER:
In 1934.
CHANDLER DAVIDSON:
And you were living in Ft. Worth at the time?
MARGARET CARTER:
Yes.
CHANDLER DAVIDSON:
And had he earned his law degree by then?
MARGARET CARTER:
Oh yes, he wasn't about to marry me until he had his Texas law degree.
CHANDLER DAVIDSON:
So you had a long courtship?
MARGARET CARTER:
Oh, yes we did.
CHANDLER DAVIDSON:
This was often the case.
MARGARET CARTER:
And then we waited a long time to start our family after that.