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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Martha W. Evans, June 26, 1974. Interview A-0318. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Opposition to women's liberation

Evans strongly asserts that she did not perceive herself as a supporter of the modern women's liberation movement. Although she was a pioneering figure for women in politics in Charlotte, North Carolina, and a staunch member of the Democratic Party, Evans never publicly aligned herself with women's liberation. In fact, as she explains here, she believed that feminists gave Republican women a forum around which they could unite, much to the detriment of Democratic women's abilities as a group.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Martha W. Evans, June 26, 1974. Interview A-0318. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

WILLIAM (BILL) MOYE:
And you have been active in that sphere but not in the women's lib?
MARTHA W. EVANS:
Oh no, I don't have any part of that.
WILLIAM (BILL) MOYE:
You don't approve of people running, say, because she is a woman?
MARTHA W. EVANS:
No, I sure don't.
WILLIAM (BILL) MOYE:
And Martha McKay and those people?
MARTHA W. EVANS:
Oh, I think they are off their rockers. All they are doing, in my opinion, is giving the Republican women a forum.
WILLIAM (BILL) MOYE:
Republican women?
MARTHA W. EVANS:
Uh-huh. You look at the list. Marilyn Bissell, Republican. Ruth Easterling is a registered Democrat but she is basically Republican mentally and philosophically. Look at all of them, all they are doing is giving these people a forum. The Democratic women now are just sadsacks.