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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Frederick Douglas Alexander, April 1, 1975. Interview B-0065. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Political, economic, and social barriers impeded consolidation efforts

Alexander discusses the obstacles to the consolidation efforts, including the ascendancy of conservative power, the prevalence of racial prejudices, and the potential of excessive taxes for county residents.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Frederick Douglas Alexander, April 1, 1975. Interview B-0065. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

MOYE:
You talked about the political office-holders. I'm wondering, what about the parties? Were the parties...It seemed that a lot of the opposition leaders were Republicans. Some conservative Democrats. But, it seemed like perhaps more of the, what party structure there is in the Democratic party was more likely to be for and the Republicans to be opposed. Is there any real reason for...
FREDERICK DOUGLAS ALEXANDER:
Well, you must bear in mind that you are moving, too, in an area where the Republican philosophy of conservatism is beginning to show itself, too. It was to move to ascendancy. All of these were factors. You must bear in mind that the arch-conservative philosophy of the Republican party, built on a law and order theme, is still prevalent. It was very prevalent then. As I said, you have much of the conservative philosophy raising it's head and asserting itself. Because it could see control weakening under consolidation, under an open government so to speak. You see?
MOYE:
SO that...
FREDERICK DOUGLAS ALEXANDER:
And, you're going to put control into too many hands, which makes it difficult for arch-conservatism to advance. So, you've got to bear in mind that you also came face-to-face with people's prejudices. Then of course, you had the county problem of where there was a county feeling that they would be absorbed into the big city and it would be more costly to them than it was as it is now. The matter of taxing was also a problem as it affected the county. Then, you also had the problem of county representation. Where the county was fighting as hard for representation on the county level, or adequate representation as the minorities, poor folks and black folks, were fighting for a broader spectrum of representation in the government period.