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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Charles M. Lowe, March 20, 1975. Interview B-0069. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Political patterns are always shifting

Lowe restates his belief in the constant shift of political patterns. He argues that the best politicians are like tailors: they retake their measurements each time. Politicians who ignore the need to adapt to changing patterns are destined to lose.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Charles M. Lowe, March 20, 1975. Interview B-0069. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

MOYE:
You say it's more issue-oriented, shifting coalitions and factions more than a sort of continuing…
LOWE:
This is absolutely right, and anybody that thinks that they've got somebody in their pocket, and they'll always vote for them, they're kidding themselves. People are learning every day to study it and say "What's in this for me and my group?" If there's something in there for them, they're for it, and, if not, they're against it. We're seeing this right now. They've been talking about building down the creek here, and making nice shops and all. It's surprising the people who come out against it, and many of the people who come out against it you thought would have been for it, but they're shifting. They're getting with some of the blacks and saying there are better places. There are higher priorities for our money. Maybe they're right. I think this is good. I think it's healthy. You know, they say the smartest man, you know is your tailer because he takes your measurements anew every time you meet. A lot of people forget this. They want to keep on building by the same old pattern.