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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Roger Gant, July 17, 1987. Interview C-0127. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Jordan served on advisory boards because of the values his father taught him

Everett Jordan believed in serving others, which led him to serve on advisory boards for Duke University and eventually serve in the Senate. His father, a Methodist preacher, taught him those values.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Roger Gant, July 17, 1987. Interview C-0127. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

Then when the game was at Carolina I would get tickets on both sides of the stadium. Everett always had seats in the guest box so I never had to worry about him and Katherine, but Rose Ann and Ann would sit on the Duke side of the stadium and the rest of the family on the Carolina side. That was no problem at all, I admired Everett's willingness to work for Duke and he did; he worked hard, and he loved his service on the board of trustees and his association with people like Semons and the other trustees, but that was his style. He recognized that service on those boards allowed him to serve in other ways. One area of service would lead to another, and of course, eventually led to the Senate for him.
BEN BULLA:
Those were good contacts.
ROGER GANT:
Yes. He didn't make the contacts to try to get to the senate, he made the contacts because he believed in service. He had inherited that from his father who as a Methodist preacher spent his life serving other people.