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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with James Lawson, October 24, 1983. Interview F-0029. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Lawson's relationship with white activists

Lawson maintained connections to a variety of white activists including Myles Horton, James Dombrowski and the Bradens.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with James Lawson, October 24, 1983. Interview F-0029. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

DALLAS A. BLANCHARD:
Myles Horton?
JAMES A. LAWSON:
Myles. Highlander School, and adult education, and, of course, a center where there could be multi-racial meetings. I did ... I did some things with him at Highlander in the late '50's and '60's, then later on I was a member of his Board. Well you know he was one of the pioneers trying to move Tennessee and the South.
DALLAS A. BLANCHARD:
Jim Dombrowski?
JAMES A. LAWSON:
OK. New Orleans. Again he was one of those folk who had a long career trying to bring about changes and was very, very supportive of the whole non-violent black movement.
DALLAS A. BLANCHARD:
Do you recall the way he supported it?
JAMES A. LAWSON:
Beg pardon?
DALLAS A. BLANCHARD:
Do you recall any specific way he supported it?
JAMES A. LAWSON:
Well, sure. Both Horton with his organization, but Dombrowski. I cannot remember that name of the group. I guess at different times I was part of his group, too. Gosh it went out of existence in the late '60's or early '70's. Ann Braden worked for him, Carl Braden. I can't recall even the blooming name of it, amm, yea, he, through that network that he tried to put together that was multi-racial, so with funds, with people who got involved with interpreting with the newsletter that used to report so many, many things and change, just a great variety of ways to support. Again, one of those whites, who had a very clear understanding of what it was all about and I think he had the confidence of a sizeable number of black people around the South. Myles would be in that category. Will Campbell would be in that category definitely.