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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Elizabeth and Courtney Siceloff, July 8, 1985. Interview F-0039. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Any pro-civil rights stance in Alabama met white resistance

Courtney Siceloff describes how Alabama reactionaries intimidated civil rights workers through the use of the press and other tactics. In Alabama, moderation was an unacceptable public stance.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Elizabeth and Courtney Siceloff, July 8, 1985. Interview F-0039. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

COURTNEY SICELOFF Why don't I tell you about . You lived there in Alabama which probably even more difficult to try to express one's self, how one really felt. Just some examples. The guys had a very moderate publication and had to leave town. But this happened with Commission on Civil Rights. I think on three occasions they had a committee put together and it would be leaked to the press and the white members all had to resign. They never even got formed, they had only agreed to serve with these black people. There was one who was an insurance salesman in Georgetown that had to leave his business, and he finally was able to get started in something else, a laborer. But the pressures, I know the conference I was going to be attending in Highlander one Christmastime, the Courier sent a reporter up there and reported everyone who was in attendance there. And I can . . . the smear that the News Courier put on the Southern Regional Council about all of these connections with the SCEF. So that being a member of an organization which got all of this publicity, pressure . . . you'd have to make your decision. But you must have seen that obviously all around. This isn't anything new to you. If you're going to stay in your profession . . . the pressures from such.