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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Mary Price Adamson, April 19, 1976. Interview G-0001. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Adamson's motivations

Despite all the hardships she encountered, Adamson believes that what she did was nothing more than what she had to do. In this excerpt, she explains her motivations and what drove her to stand where she did in the various political debates she joined.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Mary Price Adamson, April 19, 1976. Interview G-0001. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

MARY FREDERICKSON:
How did you feel about what had preceded? I mean, did you sort of have good feelings about the Progressive party and the Wallace effort and your participation in it? Was that overriding, or were you sort of . . . were you ever down about what had happened? Was it personally strengthening or was it a damaging thing personally?
MARY PRICE ADAMSON:
The whole experience has been strengthening for me and I'll make a statement about that. But . . .oh, there was something else I was going to say before I said that and I've forgotten, but beginning with my activity in the trade union movement in New York in the thirties and my contact with all of these various things, I didn't do any of it for financial reasons or self-aggrandizement, but the whole experience has made a difference in my kind of life and it has made it worthwhile for me. I'm a different kind of person than I would have been if I had grown up on the farm in North Carolina or if I had gotten some kind of office job and married as one might have expected. I can't regret the trials and tribulations and so forth, because I feel that my life has been a lot more interesting for me and worth a little bit. I'm glad to have participated. Oh, what I was going to say was that by that time I had made up my mind that in the class struggle that goes on, I'm on the side of the working class. I don't want to be rich. I don't want to be a big shot, I 'm glad to do what I can to make this a better . . .and I'm a patriot. I'm a southern patriot and I'm a U.S.A. patriot. So, I feel strongly about these things and am glad to do what I can.