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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Eleanor Copenhaver Anderson, November 5, 1974. Interview G-0005. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Importance of industrial working women as the YWCA splintered along class lines

Working-class women developed separate organizations from the middle-class management. Anderson reminisces that the industrial women had been the vanguard of the women's movement.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Eleanor Copenhaver Anderson, November 5, 1974. Interview G-0005. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

MARY FREDERICKSON:
Well, were you in favor of separating industrial girls. . . . Having a separate department or club for industrial girls.
ELEANOR COPENHAVER ANDERSON:
Oh, I certainly was. I may have been wrong, but. . . yes.
STILLE:
See, the business girls were at that time beginning to have big business girls clubs and all.
ELEANOR COPENHAVER ANDERSON:
Very upper class and conservative. But that's all changed. The industrial was the real movement, there's no doubt about that.
MARY FREDERICKSON:
You were actually setting up industrial clubs, weren't you?
ELEANOR COPENHAVER ANDERSON:
Yes, I guess....