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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Eleanor Copenhaver Anderson, November 5, 1974. Interview G-0005. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Communists' racial and religious beliefs hampered their success in organizing

Communists proved to be effective organizers, especially among mountaineers who were generally unconcerned with ideological affiliation. However, Communists' racial and religious views did antagonize mountain workers.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Eleanor Copenhaver Anderson, November 5, 1974. Interview G-0005. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

MARY FREDERICKSON:
I was just wondering if you thought the communists in that particular strike, whether they were or weren't good organizers.
ELEANOR COPENHAVER ANDERSON:
I think they were good organizers. And the dear old darling mountaineers who were the members, they didn't mind them being a communist. I'm pretty sure of that.
MARY FREDERICKSON:
But they did have some problems, though, the communists because of their position on race relations.
ELEANOR COPENHAVER ANDERSON:
Certainly.
MARY FREDERICKSON:
Which tended to antagonize the workers.
ELEANOR COPENHAVER ANDERSON:
Of course Lois MacDonald has written on all of that. I have those books in Virginia. No use of my looking for anything here. Let's see. Frank Graham died, didn't he? He knew all of that. He wasn't scared of communists.
MARY FREDERICKSON:
How much of a factor was being afraid?
ELEANOR COPENHAVER ANDERSON:
Oh, it was a great deal and it was religious, too. But if you were a communist you were anti-Jesus. All of that was in it.