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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Rosamonde R. Boyd, October 29, 1973. Interview G-0011. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Hopes to reverse low female involvement in politics

Too few women are politically involved, Boyd says in this excerpt. She is hopeful that this trend will change with the generation in college in the 1970s.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Rosamonde R. Boyd, October 29, 1973. Interview G-0011. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

My criticism of the activity of women after the franchise has been that, even yet, too few women register, or if they register, too few women vote. I can make this criticism of men too. People who go out of town on election day-they're just being dumb. Although it improves percentage-wise each year, it isn't anything like it should be even yet. Another thing, I don't think women have been courageous enough, or serious enough, to go out for public office. I think that here in Spartanburg we should have had more women that would run for school board membership. We should have women running for city council. We should have many more women in the legislature than we have.
CONSTANCE MYERS:
Has Converse College not consistently promoted women's active participation in the world at large? You would think that a community with a woman's college would have this kind of emphasis.
ROSAMONDE R. BOYD:
I think they have had excellent emphasis on women educating themselves for responsible positions but I think it's largely been in the professional and occupational and vocational fields. I don't think they have stressed, to any great extent, the responsibilities of women politically. Although in the last ten years, we have had a Democratic Club and Republican Club of students and in the last few elections the students have been extremely active. They've had straw ballots on campus of course. They have attended rallies of their respective parties and they have appeared on television. That is now improving, rapidly.
CONSTANCE MYERS:
I believe that it is. I believe that this current generation of young women is taking a role in politics.
ROSAMONDE R. BOYD:
I think so.
CONSTANCE MYERS:
This augurs well.
ROSAMONDE R. BOYD:
Yes, it does.