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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Septima Poinsette Clark, July 25, 1976. Interview G-0016. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Social activism would make remarriage difficult

Clark traveled so often while working with the SCLC and the Highlander Folk School that an average married life would have been too constricting. If she had remarried, she may have been unable to continue civil rights work.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Septima Poinsette Clark, July 25, 1976. Interview G-0016. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

JACQUELYN HALL:
I wonder, if you had married again, whether you would have been able to do the things that you've done in your life.
SEPTIMA POINSETTE CLARK:
I doubt it. I don't think I would have been able very much. I'm very sure that a man wouldn't put up with it. See, the way I had to go, sometimes I made three cities in a day, working for the SCLC and Highlander Folk School. Maybe I'd speak in Seattle this morning, and I'll hop a plane and I'd get to Calgary, and I'll hop another plane and I'd go to Alberta. A man wouldn't hardly putup with that. I didn't get back here but just around Christmas, maybe I'd have one or two days. I was gone all the time. And at Highlander Christmas was the time when they had a kind of Christmas workshop for college students who wanted to come, so you didn't get to leave.