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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Josephine Glenn, June 27, 1977. Interview H-0022. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Entertainment in Swepsonville, North Carolina

For entertainment, the people of Swepsonville organized baseball teams, held community parties, and threw square dances. When they wanted other activities such as the movies, they went to Burlington.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Josephine Glenn, June 27, 1977. Interview H-0022. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

CLIFF KUHN:
What did people in Swepsonville do for entertainment in those days?
JOSEPHINE GLENN:
They didn't do anything much. Went to the movies or something like that. That had a community center there. Once in a while they'd have somebody over there to entertain, or maybe have some kind of gathering over there, or something up at Alexander Wilson School sometimes. And church activities. That's all there was there. And they had a ball team. Usually they had the juniors in softball, and then for several years they had a men's baseball team.
CLIFF KUHN:
Did they recruit the baseball players?
JOSEPHINE GLENN:
Yes.
CLIFF KUHN:
How did they do that?
JOSEPHINE GLENN:
There was right many of the employees that had played in school, and . And they built a real nice ball park down there at one time. Had the bleachers and the lights and everything. It was nice. I don't know what happened. I don't know whether they lost interest or what, but they quit. But the smaller ones kept playing, and they'd have softball and basketball sometimes, square dances once in a while . [Laughter]
CLIFF KUHN:
Did you ever come to Burlington around that time, other than to go to work?
JOSEPHINE GLENN:
Oh, yes.
CLIFF KUHN:
What did people come to Burlington for?
JOSEPHINE GLENN:
They came to Burlington to shop, go to the movies. There was no place down there to shop other than little grocery stores there in the country, and you just didn't buy all your groceries at a place like that. You went to the chain stores or a bigger store to buy your groceries.
CLIFF KUHN:
You never thought about moving to Burlington?
JOSEPHINE GLENN:
No.
CLIFF KUHN:
Why was that?
JOSEPHINE GLENN:
I don't know. We lived in Graham for a little while one time, during the winter of '39 and '40, and we didn't like Graham.
CLIFF KUHN:
Why was that?
JOSEPHINE GLENN:
It wasn't home. [Laughter]
CLIFF KUHN:
During all this time, did you always have a garden?
JOSEPHINE GLENN:
No, not always, but sometimes.
CLIFF KUHN:
Was there much communication between people who worked in the mill and people who stayed in the country, the farmers?
JOSEPHINE GLENN:
Yes.
CLIFF KUHN:
Were most of your friends farmers or mill workers?
JOSEPHINE GLENN:
I had friends in the country and there in the village, too. And the other people did, too.