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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Zelma Montgomery Murray, March 4, 1976. Interview H-0034. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

No interest in joining a union

Zelma and Charles Murray say they never heard much talk about unions and did not join one.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Zelma Montgomery Murray, March 4, 1976. Interview H-0034. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

BRENT GLASS:
Did they ever talk there about starting a union?
ZELMA MONTGOMERY MURRAY:
No, not while I was there. That was a real good place to work there.
BRENT GLASS:
Would you have joined if they had started a union? Did you ever think about that?
ZELMA MONTGOMERY MURRAY:
Well no, I never did think about it. But I always felt this way in a place like that: that you depended to your living. And I always felt like if the majority was in it, well then I wouldn't hold them back. That's all I know, although I don't believe in the union.
BRENT GLASS:
What about you, Mr. Murray? If they had had one over here at Glencoe would you have joined?
CHARLES MURRAY:
Well, I don't know.
BRENT GLASS:
Did you ever think about that?
CHARLES MURRAY:
I didn't think much about it, no. Well, the union's all right, but they get too. . . .
ZELMA MONTGOMERY MURRAY:
Well, I never did think nothing about the union, but that's the way I feel. I think I would have thought about it if they had formed a union and the majority was going to. I wouldn't have been different; I'd have been with the bargaining. That's the only way to get anything is to stick together.
BRENT GLASS:
Yes.
ZELMA MONTGOMERY MURRAY:
When I worked at Brown there was never no talk of no union. And even when I worked down here for Mr. Green in finishing. I liked it both places.