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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Nell Putnam Sigmon, December 13, 1979. Interview H-0143. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Arthur Little becomes owner of a glove-making factory

Sigmon describes how Arthur Little rose to own his glove-making mill and reflects on his managerial skills.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Nell Putnam Sigmon, December 13, 1979. Interview H-0143. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

JACQUELYN HALL:
Who owned these different places where you worked?
NELL PUTNAM SIGMON:
Arthur Little owns this one that I work for now. He used to work as shipping clerk when I did. And he married a schoolteacher, and she inherited some money, and that's how he got his plant, and now he has six. So he's just made money make money.
JACQUELYN HALL:
What kind of a boss is he?
NELL PUTNAM SIGMON:
He owns the place. He's just an ordinary… [laughter] I just sort of grew up with him, too, although he's older than I am. I don't know. He just sits around the office, but when I'm up there and I see him, he wanted to know how I'm getting along and all about it and everything. One time I had thought about giving up my machine, and then I thought, "Well, shucks, no. Now that I've reached the retirement age, that'll give me something to do when I don't have nothing to do." Although, now I take spells; I paint and stuff like that. But still, that's not what I want to do every day in all the time. So that's why I hang onto my machine. I like to make a little extra money, too.