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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Vesta and Sam Finley, July 22, 1975. Interview H-0267. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Going to labor schools for workers

Vesta lists the various people who went either to Brookwood Labor College or the Bryn Mawr Summer School for Women Workers. By the time they returned, however, the strike had fallen apart because of the violence.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Vesta and Sam Finley, July 22, 1975. Interview H-0267. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

MARY FREDERICKSON:
There were some people from Brookwood Labor College; did you hear about Brookwood?
SAM FINLEY:
A.J. Mursky, for one?
MARY FREDERICKSON:
Right. Did you meet him? Did you talk to him?
SAM FINLEY:
Yes. I liked him all right.
MARY FREDERICKSON:
He was Dutch, I believe.
VESTA FINLEY:
Well anyway, we had a man that went to that Brookwood School up there; Mr. Ayet and his wife went there. Gracie-she's dead now-she went to summer school. And then she went to Bryn Mawr. They had a school there. But Mr. Ayet went to Brookwood.
MARY FREDERICKSON:
Do you remember him talking about it? What did he think of it?
VESTA FINLEY:
Well, he never did make any. . . . Well, he enjoyed being up there, and he thought it was a great experience going. But as far as him a doing any talking much about it, he didn't have an occasion to; except just from person to person you don't hear much. I think maybe he learned something up there about the communists. It was up there they had some too. But he didn't ever talk too very much about it.
MARY FREDERICKSON:
Did he try to do any organizing or anything when he came back?
VESTA FINLEY:
He didn't, no.
SAM FINLEY:
No.
MARY FREDERICKSON:
Was it all over by then, or. . . .
VESTA FINLEY:
More or less.
SAM FINLEY:
There wasn't much organizing done after these people got killed. It just kind of passed away.
VESTA FINLEY:
But Mrs. Ayet and me made rugs together. We got burlap, and we went to these hosiery mills and bought these second tops-I mean, they didn't use them as throw-aways; rather they sold them to people. And we dyed them. We made rugs and shipped them all over the country: New York and places.
MARY FREDERICKSON:
To raise money for the. . . .
VESTA FINLEY:
No, for making money for ourselves [laughter]