Documenting the American South Logo
oral histories of the American South
Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Vesta and Sam Finley, July 22, 1975. Interview H-0267. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Roles for women in the strike and at the labor schools

Vesta talks about the positions women were allowed to hold as a part of the strike and the sort of training they received at the various labor schools.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Vesta and Sam Finley, July 22, 1975. Interview H-0267. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

What about the role of women in the union?
VESTA FINLEY:
Well, they didn't have anything much to do except just holler and scream around when they was on picket lines [laughter] . We girls that went to summer school, when they had their meetings they wanted us all to come back and make a speech, and tell what was happening in summer school, and somewhat what we'd learned and all. Of course as I said, Miss McNutt over there taught economics, I guess you'd call it; and we had drama and English, and math and gym . . . and that's about it, you know.
MARY FREDERICKSON:
You mentioned before some of the people who came to speak while you were at the Summer School; you mentioned Frank Graham and. . . .
VESTA FINLEY:
Frank Graham and Paul Green. He's a drama . . . he writes plays, doesn't he? He was up there one time; he was just a young fellow. He came up there with Frank. But boy, Frank Graham carried me away. That man used words to express what he was saying and oh, it was wonderful to hear him talk [laughter] . Well, you didn't hear him. But oh, that was an educated man