Documenting the American South Logo
oral histories of the American South
Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Nancy Holt, October 27, 1985. Interview K-0010. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Loose lines of demarcation of the town's borders

According to Holt, there were no spatial lines drawn among the various towns that composed Cane Creek. She expresses that she remained ignorant of the distinct areas within the community until outsiders illuminated the precise boundaries.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Nancy Holt, October 27, 1985. Interview K-0010. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

FRANCES E. WEBB:
I sort of heard that there's sort of three different areas - isn't there something called Teer and Oaks and Orange Grove? Doesn't, doesn't that make up Cane Creek?
NANCY HOLT:
Yeah.
FRANCES E. WEBB:
But you, you sort of see the whole area as one community...
NANCY HOLT:
Yeah, yeah. Never, never has - you see, we didn't even know that these things were called Oaks, Teer and Cane Creek until somebody from the outside told us. It's like when I went to school I came home one day and I said "Mama, what's poor?" She said "Why?" I said "Somebody told me I was poor today." And it's like having to go to school to find out you weren't rich, cause we'd never given it any thought. And until somebody from the outside came in and told us we were three separate communities, hell, we didn't know it [Laughter] .