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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Cynthia Sykes Cook, February 19, 1994. Interview K-0091. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Grief upon learning about company reorganization

Cook recalls hearing the awful news that her division of the company would be moving. She was fortunate to secure an offer for a different position, but remembers the feeling that her family was being separated.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Cynthia Sykes Cook, February 19, 1994. Interview K-0091. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

I will never forget when they came down and one of the girls told me that they had just been told they were going to be moving. It was almost like a death in the family or something. You just felt like you were seeing it disolve so it was hard.
VALERIE PAWLEWICZ:
You didn't go, you took on a different job.
CYNTHIA SYKES COOK:
Yes. See they gave me that job before we knew any of this. It wasn't, "Do you want to do this job?" It was, "We'd like for you to do this job."
VALERIE PAWLEWICZ:
Which is different.
CYNTHIA SYKES COOK:
It wasn't really a decision to make on my part. I felt kind of left out for awhile, but then it really was best for me, I think, to stay because I don't I could handle riding to High Point everyday. Of course, they managed.
VALERIE PAWLEWICZ:
I was worried for you: can you imagine having to get up at…?
CYNTHIA SYKES COOK:
They do that and they are still doing that. They say it isn't all that bad, it's just what you get used to I guess. I really enjoyed doing that, but it just felt like that part of your family had moved away. We still get together. We got together this past Christmas, all the ladies that had worked together and it was fun. We try to keep in touch.