Documenting the American South Logo
oral histories of the American South
Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Andy Foley, May 18, 1994. Interview K-0095. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Comfortable job, but with some pressures

Foley describes a comfortable job making drawers where he knew what to expect from day to day. He disliked when he fell behind, however, and the pressure to increase his output.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Andy Foley, May 18, 1994. Interview K-0095. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

JEFF COWIE:
So getting back to the work process, what is it you liked about working there?
ANDY FOLEY:
I like that it was comfortable. Going to work I knew what my job would be for that day basically. Because like the day before I would have to keep up with what I needed and how many they was running per hour. So I would basically know the next day, you know, what I needed going in. If everybody was there then I'd know that I really would have no problem keeping up. I just knew what was going on basically. I reckon that's what made me comfortable.
JEFF COWIE:
On the other hand, what was it you didn't like about working at White's?
ANDY FOLEY:
I didn't like when I would happen to get behind or if I didn't have it seemed like eight million drawers ready Homer would come over there, "You ain't got enough." And then it's like, "I know what I'm doing. You see that chart? I got enough." But it's like, he wouldn't say too much about it. What was that other supervisor's name? I'll remember his name. He was bald-headed, and we called him "Chrome Dome" when he wasn't around.
JEFF COWIE:
[laughter]
ANDY FOLEY:
But, Marshall Murdock, that was his name, but when he would come through it was like you could never have enough for him. He's the one that I can honestly say that nobody I spoke to really thought much of because of his attitude. There might have been a few people here and there that he got along with, but he really wouldn't associate with none of us. He wasn't there too long before it closed.
JEFF COWIE:
So he was a part of the new…
ANDY FOLEY:
Yeah, he was a new generation or whatever you want to call it. He just never really interacted with us employees so, none of us really thought much of him. My guess you've got that kind everywhere you go.