Documenting the American South Logo
Loading
Collections >> Oral Histories of the American South >> Document Menu
Oral History Interview with Latrelle McAllister, June 25, 1998. Interview K-0173. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
Audio with Transcript
  • Listen Online with Text Transcript (Requires QuickTime and JavaScript)
  • Transcript Only (27 p.)
  • HTML file
  • XML/TEI source file
  • Download Complete Audio File (MP3 format / ca. 103 MB, 00:56:36)
  • MP3
  • Abstract
    Latrelle McAllister, an African American woman who attended West Charlotte High School from 1973 to 1976, remembers her experiences there. Like many former West Charlotte students, she recalls a vibrant, diverse atmosphere, animated in part by a flashy marching band. She believes in the value of integration and its role in exposing students to diverse culture, but worries about the effects of busing on neighborhood cohesion. Despite the fracturing effects of busing, McAllister believes that West Charlotte remains a rallying point for her Charlotte community.
    Excerpts
  • Growing up near West Charlotte High School
  • Busing nurtured friendships
  • Concerns that desegregation will close black schools
  • Remembering a nurturing teacher, a rare breed these days
  • Teachers shield students from turmoil of desegregation
  • West Charlotte's relative wealth keeps it calm during desegregation
  • Relative comfort despite segregation
  • Remembering Martin Luther King's assassination
  • Manners insulate black woman against racism
  • Remembering West Charlotte's exceptional marching band
  • Importance of West Charlotte as a symbol
  • Reflections on the utility of integration
  • Learn More
  • Finding aid to the Southern Oral History Program Collection
  • Database of all Southern Oral History Program Collection interviews
  • Resources for Educators
  • Race in Charlotte Schools Learning Object
  • Subjects
  • School integration--North Carolina--Charlotte
  • West Charlotte High School (N.C.)
  • Charlotte (N.C.)--Race relations
  • McAllister, Latrelle
  • The Southern Oral History Program transcripts presented here on Documenting the American South undergo an editorial process to remove transcription errors. Texts may differ from the original transcripts held by the Southern Historical Collection.

    Funding from the Institute for Museum and Library Services supported the electronic publication of this title.