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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Carl A. Mills Jr., June 30, 1999. Interview K-0182. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Small African American population eases desegregation process

There were so few African Americans in the Cary area that Mills and others were able to desegregate shortly after the ruling was handed down.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Carl A. Mills Jr., June 30, 1999. Interview K-0182. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

So now you were Principal of Cary High School, or Cary Elementary, when integration was made law.
CARL A. MILLS JR.:
Elementary and Junior High. Those two portions became East Cary, and Cary Elementary when it was later settled down. There was such a small number of black kids in the Cary attendance area that the feeling was that that was an ideal time to integrate. This meant thirty kids, thirty black kids when into the ninth grade, and about sixty went to the high school, a very token situation. But that's all there were.