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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Fran Jackson, March 23, 2001. Interview K-0208. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Integration blamed for decline of black student involvement in public schools

Jackson's active involvement at the segregated black school sharply contrasts with her lack of involvement in the integrated high school. She argues that blacks felt excluded and isolated in integrated schools.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Fran Jackson, March 23, 2001. Interview K-0208. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

FRAN JACKSON:
Oh! In Northside I was in-. We always had school plays. I was in all the school plays and all of the different activities that were held. Because it was an elementary school we did not have a lot of you know extracurricular kinds of the things that you associate with the high school. But what activities they did have, I participated in and I have a retired principal who had some old pictures showing us in school plays and different kinds of things. So while I do-. Can't remember everything I do recall that as being a very important time in my life, and a time when I, I was generally very happy and participated a lot. I've got somebody who needs to see me you want to just hit the-.
CHRISTA BROADNAX:
Okay. [Recorder is turned off and then back on.]
CHRISTA BROADNAX:
Okay. What activities did you participate in once you went to high school?
FRAN JACKSON:
Absolutely nothing.
CHRISTA BROADNAX:
And that was by choice or by force or-.
FRAN JACKSON:
Well I guess it was by choice but nothing-. It was not made inviting. No one made an effort to encourage me to participate in any activities at the high school. It just wasn't, it wasn't inviting.