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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Charlene Regester, February 23, 2001. Interview K-0216. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Reluctance to implement black studies into the curriculum

Regester's student activism helped to incorporate black history into the curriculum. Despite the inclusion of black studies courses, teachers failed to implement the new curriculum.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Charlene Regester, February 23, 2001. Interview K-0216. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

SUSAN UPTON:
Whenever you did like the sit-in for the black history curriculum did you get the black history classes?
CHARLENE REGESTER:
Yes, they did begin to incorporate that at that particular time. And I thought it good that they did.
SUSAN UPTON:
Like the other problems you had at that school, were you successful at getting many things done?
CHARLENE REGESTER:
I think on some level we were, and you can... one thing that you learn is that you can create activities, you can force them to offer certain kinds of thing, but if the encouragement is not there and if the attitudes of teachers perhaps cannot be altered, then it's really hard to alter, make these things affective even after you push to have them implemented or instituted., so that's the biggest thing.