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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Thomas Henderson, October 28, 1999. Interview K-0228. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Negative impression of the entrance of female buyers and sellers in the tobacco industry

Here, Henderson describes the entrance of women into the tobacco industry as buyers and sellers as a negative transformation. According to Henderson women tobacco buyers and sellers were a distraction. His comments reveal one way in which the entrance of women into a male-dominated industry was perceived by male workers.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Thomas Henderson, October 28, 1999. Interview K-0228. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

THOMAS HENDERSON:
Back where I came from the allotments were so small a man that had ten acres up there he had a bigger lot. Here ten acres is nothing. There's plenty of people that has forty, fifty, sixty, seventy as much as two hundred acres of tobacco. And it was-down here was where it was grown most. My little town [unclear] sold three or four million pounds that was it. Down here in Greenville when I came they were selling seventy million. And they-come on down there now-. This year I heard someone sell a million. I don't even go down there. It's so different.
CHARLES THOMPSON:
How is it different?
THOMAS HENDERSON:
Well, in the first place, you've got women in it. [Laughter] They've got women graders, women buyers and I don't like it. I remember [unclear] Davis warehouse in Fairmont and this woman-I knew her-got in the sale right ahead of me. But she was just spectating, you know. And I just-I didn't-I said, "Sarah, go up there in front of [unclear] he'll buy more of your tobacco than I am." She made me-I couldn't think. And I was working making a living. She was a doll. She looked good but I didn't want her messing up my work. And-but now they have women graders, women buyers, women everywhere.