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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Ran Kong, November 25, 2000. Interview K-0269. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Close relationship between granddaughter and grandmother in a Cambodian home

Kong describes her close relationship with her grandmother. She explains that this closeness is traditional in Cambodian culture.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Ran Kong, November 25, 2000. Interview K-0269. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

BARBARA LAU:
Can you talk a little bit about the role of your grandmother in your life when you were a young girl?
RAN KONG:
When we were young, both of my parents had to work. And so in the household it was really convenient that my grandmother was there, that she could take care of all of us, sort of like our babysitter. But obviously, in our culture, grandparents are a very important part of the household. And so she was like our second mom in a way. I think personally, with me, my relationship with her is even deeper because you know, I sleep with her, and when I was small, I didn't really follow my parents. Like wherever my grandmother went, I had to be there. And so out of the three of us, I think it was my grandmother and me spent the most time together. But she was the one in our household who, you know, before my parents made a decision, it was kind of like, well, is it going to be good for her? You know, is it going to benefit my grandmother? Is it going to benefit the kids? And then, okay, then it's good for the family. So the decision to move, will it be good for my grandmother? Will it be good for the kids? And then, okay, we move.