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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Richard Bowman, July 8, 1998. Interview K-0513. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

School integration controversies in Asheville made little practical difference to black students

School integration did not seem noteworthy to Bowman and other black students at the time because their schools already used long-distance busing. Some of the black students in Asheville used dilapidated buses left over from the white schools as transportation from the outskirts of the city.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Richard Bowman, July 8, 1998. Interview K-0513. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

KELLY ELAINE NAVIES:
You had support and guidance there-um, this was-so you were there between what 47 and 51 about and this was a little bit before the 1954 decision, but I'm wondering was this anything that was discussed at all in school?-that the end of segregation might be coming or anything like that?
RICHARD BOWMAN:
No
KELLY ELAINE NAVIES:
It was never-
RICHARD BOWMAN:
We never even thought of it-I mean we'd see the students uh come in and not realize what they were going through the students from the outskirts of Asheville-Black Mountain, Weaverville, Mars Hill and these used school buses that had been given to them by the white schools-some of em had no windows or broken windows whatnot and the students had to ride those buses and that's why when people would start talkin about busin, I said, gee we've been doing it for years with us-they've been busin us all over the place.