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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Thurman Couch, February 12, 2001. Interview K-0537. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Economic discrimination hurts African Americans

In this brief excerpt, Couch speaks out against economic discrimination against African Americans, and worries that "the black community is on its way out."

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Thurman Couch, February 12, 2001. Interview K-0537. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

TC: Yeah, because I’m a fighter for real. RG: I can see that. TC: I’ll talk to you, my wife and I, we are in the struggle now for real. RG: So you’re still committed TC: ‘Til the day I leave here. I want my, look, blacks have got to own things in this country. It’s ridiculous. You can’t even own a home. You walk in to get a home, you can’t even talk to a loan officer. It depends on how they’re feeling that day, if they gonna, they may got their quota of all they’re going to let own a home in Durham, or in Chapel Hill. Or the people that’s been over there in the Northside area for years, and let somebody come in and buy up all the property. Nothing’s going to remain black in Chapel Hill, they’re going to destroy the black community. The black community is on its way out. It’s unbelievable. Just unbelievable.