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Oral History Interview with Edith Warren, August 28, 2002. Interview K-0601. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
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  • Abstract
    Edith Warren, a state representative for North Carolina's Eighth District, can boast of a number of firsts: she was the first female principal in Pitt County and became the county's first female commissioner. In this interview, she describes the background that led her into education and politics, but spends most of her time describing the aftermath of Hurricane Floyd, which devastated the region in 1996. Spared serious damage to her own property, Warren was determined to help her community. She did so in ways big and small, taking food to needy residents and struggling with the state government to release funds held up by the state government. Researchers will learn a lot about Warren's character, Hurricane Floyd, and some of the difficulties that small communities face when dealing with big problems.
    Excerpts
  • A woman finds friendships with male peers on the job
  • Parents encourage civic engagement
  • Smooth integration process in Pitt County
  • Growth in Pitt County
  • Hurricane Floyd's devastating impact
  • The rebirth of Princeville, North Carolina
  • Struggling to find money for recovery
  • Smaller counties were at a disadvantage as they tried to rebuild
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  • Finding aid to the Southern Oral History Program Collection
  • Database of all Southern Oral History Program Collection interviews
  • The Southern Oral History Program transcripts presented here on Documenting the American South undergo an editorial process to remove transcription errors. Texts may differ from the original transcripts held by the Southern Historical Collection.

    Funding from the Institute for Museum and Library Services supported the electronic publication of this title.