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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Chandrika Dalal, July 22, 1999. Interview K-0814. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Ethnic and national differences supersede racial differences

Dalal refutes the notion that America is free, especially for foreign people. She argues that southern white supervisors discriminate against non-whites and non-blacks, replacing the black versus white racial dynamic with an American versus "other" dynamic.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Chandrika Dalal, July 22, 1999. Interview K-0814. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

CHANDRIKA DALAL:
And-, that all lost-, how much they say, free speech-, and-, America is a free country. But I don't think it is free. They give-, you are foreign people. Everywhere you go, they treat you bad. In my working place, my team leader, my supervisor, treat me different than black people, because I'm not black. I'm good in my work-, I (have) work(ed) here for thirteen years. (The) department people don't have any complaint, but-, still-, they treat good-, black people-, than any other people, Mexican or white or Indian. It's still there. There's a lot of discrimination-, race and nation, or anything, or color-, or something-, but still it's there. Because my daughter have a same problem, in [unclear] . Her supervisor treat(s) her bad. Sometimes she come(s) and cries, she hate(s) this job. She work(s) for money, but still-, their treatment different than other employee(s) because she is not black or white-, she is Indian.
ANDREW JILANI:
And her supervisor was—?
CHANDRIKA DALAL:
White!
ANDREW JILANI:
He was white, okay. So, you feel that, at work, you're also discriminated—?
CHANDRIKA DALAL:
That's right.
ANDREW JILANI:
And it—.
CHANDRIKA DALAL:
In the town they do it.
ANDREW JILANI:
And in—.
CHANDRIKA DALAL:
In (the) working place, government job, they do it to you. One supervisor go(es) and another come(s), they have a same impression, they treat you same way, again and again and again. So it's not change(ed). How much you (are), how much you (are) smart, still it's (the) same.