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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Richard Hicks, February 1, 1991. Interview M-0023. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Desegregation does not affect principalship

Hicks insists that desegregation has not affected his role as principal; he would do the job the same way in any situation, he says. Lurking behind his confidence is the sense that he is aware of the potential effects of race and desegregation on his position and has worked hard to avoid them.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Richard Hicks, February 1, 1991. Interview M-0023. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

GOLDIE F. WELLS:
How did the desegregation of schools affect your role as a principal?
RICHARD HICKS:
It hasn't affected mine at all and I know being a minority I have always felt that I do the best job that I can do in any situation and I don't know of a whole lot of people who can do a better job than I can do in a situation. So it didn't make any difference with me as it doesn't make any difference with me now whether I am working for Durham City or Durham County in a merger. Our emphasis should be on children and I have trained myself to work with other people to make sure that children benefit. That is my answer to desegregation.