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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Charles Johnson, December 29, 1990. Interview M-0025. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Minority teachers are role models for minority students

Johnson tries to increase the number of minority teachers at his school in order to provide role models for his black students. He believes that white teachers and black students do not always understand one another.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Charles Johnson, December 29, 1990. Interview M-0025. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

GOLDIE F. WELLS:
So one of your priorities in selecting at this point since you only have four, five Black faculty members you really want to increase your minority.
CHARLES JOHNSON:
I want to increase my minority because I think that it is very important that we have more role models within this school and I've found that, there are excellent teachers. However I've found that some of them have difficulties understanding the Black students. And the Black students have a tendency not to understand the attitude of White teachers. But I'm not saying that they are not good teachers--they are very good teachers but I think that we need--it needs to be balanced a little more.