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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Charles Johnson, December 29, 1990. Interview M-0025. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Race does not affect role as principal

Johnson does not believe that his race has influenced his position in his community or his superiors' response to his ideas.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Charles Johnson, December 29, 1990. Interview M-0025. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

I think in one instance I think I had made a decision and I wasn't supported in my decision.
GOLDIE F. WELLS:
Do you think it was political?
CHARLES JOHNSON:
Political, oh, definitely political and I have never--even though I live here, they have the opportunity to call or come by but it doesn't matter to me as to what side of the tracks you belong. You know it could be a lawyer's child and if you have violated the rules and to be very fair to everyone you will have to suffer the consequences. And I think in many instances that has played a big part in it in his decisions on certain things.
GOLDIE F. WELLS:
And you would say it was more political than racial in your community?
CHARLES JOHNSON:
Yes, than racial. I can personally say that by being a Black man in the community it hasn't been a problem at all. And some of the decisions that have been made from the Superintendent's office have not been because of race. Because if I felt that way, I would personally speak up because I could not work in an environment like that. But you can't escape it but you accept and go on. You have to.