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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Floyd Adams, August 16, 2002. Interview R-0168. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Clean Air Act clears Savannah's skies

Adams believes that clean air was instrumental in luring tourists to the city. Before the Clean Air Act forced a cleanup, Savannah's paper mills reeked; today, in 2002, the air was clean.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Floyd Adams, August 16, 2002. Interview R-0168. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

But what has saved Savannah and people debate me on this is the Clean Air Act. I don't care what people say, if we didn't clean the air up in Savannah, people would not come in because it used to smell terrible because of the paper mills and everything else. I hated to fly in here because of the smell because as you got closer to Savannah you could smell it. But now you can do it and don't worry about it but the Clean Air Act to me as far as I'm concerned is what attracts people to Savannah. We've got clean clear air. That smell is what kept people away from here. People stayed here were working in those industries, but if we had that, they wouldn't be here. The tourists wouldn't even come I don't think regardless of what type of building, old buildings you have. They just wouldn't come because of the smell. So that to me, like I say the Chamber people and everybody argue with me about it, but I think the money that we spent, the city spent and the industry spent on clean air has helped this city tremendously. KIERAN TAYLOR Pays in the long run. FLOYD ADAMS, JR. Pays in the long run. Pays in the long run.