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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Frank Daniels Jr., September 11, 2002. Interview R-0320. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Racial discrimination at Raleigh area hospitals

Wake Medical Center was a leader in racial integration, Daniels remembers. Rex Hospital, while it did not have racially discriminatory policies, excluded blacks by custom.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Frank Daniels Jr., September 11, 2002. Interview R-0320. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

KATHLEEN KEARNS:
Again thinking about the community as a whole, looking back over the last forty-plus years, how would you describe Wake's role in integrating health care in Raleigh?
FRANK DANIELS, JR.:
You mean racially?
KATHLEEN KEARNS:
Racially.
FRANK DANIELS, JR.:
Oh, they did it. Wake did it. Rex didn't do it. Rex followed later. I don't think Rex ever had any policy against treating blacks. They just didn't do it much. And they weren't made to feel welcome. But the people who lived over on Oberlin Road, which was a black community, I don't know when they started going to Rex, but I know they went there. But I don't know that they felt comfortable there. But Wake led that issue.
KATHLEEN KEARNS:
Did that start to change at Rex with Medicaid and Medicare in the mid-1960s?
FRANK DANIELS, JR.:
Probably, probably. That would be my guess. I don't really know.
KATHLEEN KEARNS:
Are both hospitals equally integrated now?
FRANK DANIELS, JR.:
I don't know. I would guess that there are more blacks at Wake than there are at Rex, but I don't really know that. One thing is the locality would make a difference.