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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Carnell Locklear, February 24, 2004. Interview U-0007. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Native Americans are invisible until they become criminals

Locklear describes his efforts to erect markers for prominent Lumbees, complaining that the only time Native Americans enter the public consciousness is when they commit crimes.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Carnell Locklear, February 24, 2004. Interview U-0007. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

WILLIE LOWERY:
You did better than most. You did a job [unclear] .
MALINDA MAYNOR:
Very good.
CARNELL LOCKLEAR:
Yep. Well, I still say there's a lot we could do. We're the most [unclear] people in the world. I mean, God has really blessed these people.
WILLIE LOWERY:
I just hope the young people don't let all that's been done in the past to move us along fall on the wayside.
CARNELL LOCKLEAR:
I do too.
WILLIE LOWERY:
Cause they don't have the same drive we did. They got everything will be alright, Mama and Daddy's took care of it.
CARNELL LOCKLEAR:
Yeah, somebody's got to pick it up and really go with it. They've got to find an issue. And what I wanted to do, I wanted to get a marker for the 22. But I wanted to get-with the good Lord's help, and some people here in locally, I got a statue-not a statue, a name marker for Mr. Jim Chavis. Have you seen that?
MALINDA MAYNOR:
Yes.
CARNELL LOCKLEAR:
I raised 1200 dollars and had that done. I wanted to get a marker for the 22 on [Hwy] 74, and I wanted to have a streak of Highway 74 named in honor of Dr. Adolph [Dial]. Now whether we like him or not, he accomplished a great deal in his life, and he done a lot. A lot of help.
WILLIE LOWERY:
Who's that?
CARNELL LOCKLEAR:
Adolph, Mr. Adolph. Then I wanted to get something in the park, and Harold Collins approached me [unclear] . And then I wanted to go in the schools and have talent shows, get the best talent I could find, put it on video, and go before these big companies like Pepsi, Juicy Fruit, potato chips, and have our people on commercial television. Equal justice is what I'm talking about.
MALINDA MAYNOR:
Well, right. When you think about, especially in this area, regional television, the number of Indians here, and you never see them on TV unless something bad happens.
CARNELL LOCKLEAR:
Yeah, that's right.
MALINDA MAYNOR:
Unless somebody gets shot.
CARNELL LOCKLEAR:
Yeah. Somebody gets shot or somebody gets arrested for dope. You see them good, before that you don't see them.