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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Tawana Belinda Wilson-Allen, May 11, 2006. Interview U-0098. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Organization of the Carolina Community Project

Wilson-Allen explains the organizational structure of the Carolina Community Project. It served as an umbrella organization housing several other grassroots projects. She also explains how organizers were given ownership over their projects.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Tawana Belinda Wilson-Allen, May 11, 2006. Interview U-0098. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

ELIZABETH GRITTER:
So and then from the Carolina Community Project you moved to the North Carolinians for Effective Citizenship. You were--
TAWANA BELINDA WILSON-ALLEN:
Executive director.
ELIZABETH GRITTER:
So that was in '87.
TAWANA BELINDA WILSON-ALLEN:
No, that was simultaneously. I was working for Carolina Community Project. You remember I told you they created in addition to working with existing organizations, we created I know at least five [organizations], and you may be familiar with some of them. I don't know. So I had North Carolinians for Effective Citizenship, Piedmont Peace Project was going over in Concord, Charlotte Organizing Project, CHOP that was the local. So we had Grassroots regional, Carolina Community Project statewide, CHOP was the local organizing group. We had a lot of other organizations in that house I was telling you about like this was during the days of apartheid. So we had Shaw Students for a Free South Africa in there. I know I'm forgetting something. There were at least five organizations housed in that house.
ELIZABETH GRITTER:
With the Grassroots Leadership as well.
TAWANA BELINDA WILSON-ALLEN:
Yeah.
ELIZABETH GRITTER:
So you were working for all these organizations or helped create--
TAWANA BELINDA WILSON-ALLEN:
No, yeah. As an organizing [project] for Carolina Community Project we helped to create NCEC, and I led that one but a woman by the name of Linda Stout did Piedmont Peace Project. All of our organizers had a project.
ELIZABETH GRITTER:
Okay.
TAWANA BELINDA WILSON-ALLEN:
In other words, the organizer became the director or whatever. Actually when the funding started phasing out on voter work, that's when I became associate director of Carolina Community Project. Did I do that right? That's not right on your paper I don't think.