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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Suzanne Post, June 23, 2006. Interview U-0178. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Post retires from the Metropolitan Housing Commission because of her health

While at the Metropolitan Housing Commission, Post finally found the supportive network she had always desired. Unfortunately, a bout of lung cancer forced her to retire.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Suzanne Post, June 23, 2006. Interview U-0178. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

If I hadn't had lung cancer, I would be working full-time still. I loved it. I love that group. I had the longest honeymoon I ever had in my life with that board and I realized after I'd been there a couple years that housers have their heads and their hearts in the same place. Civil libertarians are only heads. They don't have a heart.
SARAH THUESEN:
What do you mean by that exactly?
SUZANNE POST:
I mean it's all an intellectual exercise. I had a terrible, terrible experience while I was working for the ACLU twenty years ago. Not one person on the board came to the hospital. Nobody sent flowers. Nobody brought food over afterwards. I mean, it's just all in their head. They're great people, but—. I didn't realize any of that until I started working for people who had a great deal of heart.
SARAH THUESEN:
Had it both.
SUZANNE POST:
And had heart, just had heart, had empathy, compassion, had no trouble saying, "I love you." It just makes a work environment so different. So I probably would have stayed in that. I told them, I said, "I'd stay in this job until you all send somebody to me or until you get together and say, ‘What are we going to do about Suzy?"’ [Laughter] Because I really loved it, but it just wasn't possible.