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Title: Letter from Charles Harris to Dr. Charles Harris, August 13, 1795: Electronic Edition.
Author: Harris, Charles Wilson, 1771-1804
Funding from the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supported the electronic publication of this title.
Text transcribed by Brian Dietz
Images scanned by Bari Helms
Text encoded by Brian Dietz
First Edition, 2005
Size of electronic edition: ca. 12K
Publisher: The University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
2005
© This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text
The electronic edition is a part of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill digital library, Documenting the American South.
Languages used in the text: English
Revision history:
2005-08-08, Brian Dietz finished TEI/XML encoding.
Source(s):
Title of collection: University of North Carolina Papers (#40005), University Archives, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Title of document: Letter from Charles Harris to Dr. Charles Harris, August 13, 1795
Author: Chas W Harris
Description: 3 pages, 4 page images
Note: Call number 40005 (University Archives, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Editorial practices
The text has been encoded using the recommendations for Level 5 of the TEI in Libraries Guidelines.
Originals are in the University Archives, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Original grammar, punctuation, and spelling have been preserved.
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All quotation marks, em dashes and ampersand have been transcribed as entity references.
All double right and left quotation marks are encoded as ".
All single right and left quotation marks are encoded as '.
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For more information about transcription and other editorial decisions, see the section Editorial Practices.
Letter from Charles Harris to Dr. Charles Harris, August 13, 1795
Harris, Charles Wilson, 1771-1804



Page 1
UNIVERSITY,
Aug. 13th, 1795.

Dr. Uncle,

I was happy in being informed by a letter from Capt. Houston that your family is increased by a son & that all is well. I should have expected to receive the first intelligence of such an occurrence from yourself. It was altogether unforeseen by me. Every addition to your family will certainly make you more of the citizen. Tho' your sincere & general benevolence had already made you a warm friend to our institution & every plan for public Utility, yet since the birth of a son you must feel yourself more nearly interested in the affairs of yl University.
Our number is now fifty-six, & a great prospect of increasing considerably in a short time. We have used our endeavours to procure another assistant. But have not been successful. We have written to a young man of my acquaintance who lives below Williamsburg in Virginia & expect an answer by the next post.
Our news at this place has given us more trouble & disappointment than information.

Page 2
I joined Mr Ker in getting Browns Daily paper but it has not arrived by the two last posts. & if it does not come more regularly we must discontinue it. There is an universal uproar against the treaty. It is said that we must garrison & defend the western posts, for the benefit of Brittish merchants—; that the East-india trade was on a better footing before; that the West-india trade is entirely destroyed—; That the hands of our legislators are tied down, that they can never take such measures for their future security as the patriotic Madison once proposed, that the reciprocity held forth in several articles is a mere nullity The Fayetteville Politicians have risked their credit in toasting this prodigy of negotiations while other companies were openly drinking him & his treaty to hell & damnation. There has been some disagreeable business in New-York on this subject & the great financier Hamilton has been very roughly handled by the people because he was supposed a friend to the treaty
The museum has made but small progress, & consists of only one Ostrich egg. I hope when it is generally known that such a collection is making in this place we shall receive considerable assistance.

Page 3
I had a very favourable opportunity about three days ago, of sending letters immediately to Cumberland by a gentleman who would travel with expedition. I endeavoured to interest David Wilson, James Wilson & Dr Donald in making collections & if no accident happens they can make some return before Winter.
My law-progress, you must conclude is slow from the great share of business & attention to which is at present necessary for me to apply myself, tho' slow, it is I think firm & determined.

I am, dear sir, with
much respect
Your's

Chas W Harris

Dr Charles Harris


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