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Title: Thomas Ruffin, Jr. to his father, January 11, 1843: Electronic Edition.
Author: Ruffin, Thomas, Jr.
Funding from the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supported the electronic publication of this title.
Text transcribed by Bari Helms
Images scanned by Bari Helms
Text encoded by Risa Mulligan
First Edition, 2005
Size of electronic edition: ca. 10K
Publisher: The University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
2005
© This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text
The electronic edition is a part of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill digital library, Documenting the American South.
Languages used in the text: English
Revision history:
2005-12-13, Risa Mulligan finished TEI/XML encoding.
Source(s):
Title of collection: Thomas Ruffin Papers (#641), Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Title of document: Thomas Ruffin, Jr. to his father, January 11, 1843
Author: Thomas Ruffin, Jr.
Description: 3 pages, 4 page images
Note: Call number 641 (Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
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Letter from Thomas Ruffin, Jr. to his father, Thomas Ruffin , January 11, 1843
Ruffin, Thomas, Jr.



Page 1

Chapel Hill

Jan 11th

Dear Father

Knowing that you would like to hear how we are all situated, I hasten to inform you so soon as we got fixed.
James is rooming with George McNeill in their same old room, which is a right good one; I am still with Fred Brodman who says that he means to study much more than he did las[t] session & I believe that he will do so, for he has certainly done more during these few days that he did during the half of last session.
We found them all well at Dr Mitchell's with the exception of Mrs. Mitchell who is still confined to her room.
We also found considerable excitement amongst the students on account of some new ordinances of the Trustees, one of which is that there shall be a recitation on Saturday, this prevents our societies from meeting then as we were used to do & will compell us to do all in one night, half of which ought to take up nearly the whole of the time. We hope however to get it repealed & I expect that there will be a petition to that effect sent to the Trustees.

Page 2
If we fail to get it repeal[ed], there will be an end, I think, to the Societies & it will be a great pity to discontinue them after so much labour & money have expended on them. The Faculty say that they do so in order to put a stop to frolicing which takes place on friday nights after the adjournment of the Societies, but it will fail to have that effect for no one frolics then but the children of college, who will frolic any way, because they think that it is smart to do so. But Papa the Faculty are to blame for the whole of it. They admit in to college children of 13 &14 years & the consequence is that they are compelled to reduce the Standard of Scholarship in order to get them through. The Societies are a humbug for their members have not the sense, it cannot be expected that they should have at their age, to keep the straight there are some here really so young that they do not know how to take care of themselves.
Mr. Smith's carriage went by for George. I heard from Hillsborough the other day & they have the Scarlet fever there very badly. One of the Mr. Turners lost three children in one week. I have not heard from home yet & cannot give you any news from there.
Please to give my respects to Mrs. Taylor & Miss Anne, also to Judge Cameron's family & to Martha

Page 3
Cain, ask her to write to me.

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