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Title: Letter from John Wesley Halliburton to his second cousin and fiancée, Juliet Halliburton, March 11, 1861: Electronic Edition.
Author: Halliburton, John Wesley, b. 1840
Funding from the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supported the electronic publication of this title.
Text transcribed by Bari Helms
Images scanned by Brian Dietz
Text encoded by Caitlin R. Donnelly
First Edition, 2007
Size of electronic edition: ca. 20K
Publisher: The University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
2007
© This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text
The electronic edition is a part of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill digital library, Documenting the American South.
Languages used in the text: English
Revision history:
2007-03-29, Caitlin R. Donnelly finished TEI/XML encoding.
Source(s):
Title of collection: John Wesley Halliburton Papers (#4414-z), Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Title of document: Letter from John Wesley Halliburton to his second cousin and fiancée, Juliet Halliburton, March 11, 1861
Author: Cousie
Description: 4 pages, 4 page images
Note: Call number 4414-z (Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Editorial practices
The text has been encoded using the recommendations for Level 5 of the TEI in Libraries Guidelines.
Originals are in the Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Original grammar, punctuation, and spelling have been preserved.
Page images can be viewed and compared in parallel with the text.
Any hyphens occurring in line breaks have been removed, and the trailing part of a word has been joined to the preceding line.
All quotation marks, em dashes and ampersand have been transcribed as entity references.
All double right and left quotation marks are encoded as ".
All single right and left quotation marks are encoded as '.
All em dashes are encoded as —.
Indentation in lines has not been preserved.

For more information about transcription and other editorial decisions, see the section Editorial Practices.
Letter from John Wesley Halliburton to his second cousin and fiancée, Juliet Halliburton, March 11, 1861
Halliburton, John Wesley, b. 1840



Page 81
Chapel Hill
March the 11th.

My Own Darling.

I have been quite fortunate to day. That is to say Cousin William has honored me with one of his life giving letters. Ed political letter has also come and as I see that you are so opposed to the discussion of politics I am almost tempted to eschew the whole business. I heard from father a day or two since through Jimmie Garrison. He (father) intends to let me take a tour of the Northern States next summer. I will first go to Richmond — then to Washington (Mt Vernon) BaltimorePhilaNewyork — The Springs along there — New PortPortland MainequebecMontreal (as I go up the St Lawrence) on to the Niagara Falls, cross the lake and bathe in every one of them. Cross over over to Chicago — then to Lake Itaska (Indian Guide) then all through there to Cincinatti — then down the Ohio to Memphis! And then of course to Little Rock.
Father thinks that I am going there for improvement but I am going so that I can be your Pilot as we go on a tour next fall. I'll have learned the ropes and will be able to make my darling more comfortable as we together make this splendid tour.

Page 82
My darling I am at a loss how or what to write to day. I am very dull here lately. I am growing more and more anxious to leave this place. Oh! Cousie it does seem that the nearer I get to my graduation the slower the time flies. Darling I feel more and more like leaving every day. If I had my own way I would not stay another day. No! I would bring this letter and not send it. Our Dancing Master has come and I intend to "Take lessons" for the last time. I know not that I will ever dance much — but still I would like to know the art. Our Ball Tickets will soon be on hand and I intend to distribute some of them around promiscuously. Few if any will honor me I guess but I will feel like I had done my duty. Oh! my darling if you and Fannie would Come! I could assure you that you would have a most excellent time. You and Sister could find hansome young men to your heart's content and not have to endure such fellows as Wilbur and P. Why I declare I could get some retired rooms for you and her and you could have the use of the parlor and such nice fellows as I would bring around would make you mad with joy. Then such music! Such Speaking! Such a Supper!

Page 82
Such dancing! My Cousie you never would forget it as long as you live. Ladies will accompany the organ — Military companies will parade — Bands of music will burst forth in noble strains! All will be joy, hilarity and the most intoxicating excitement.
Can you and Sister come. It will cost you $150.00 apiece but you will feel that you have not spent it foolishly.
Shakspeare once said that — "Who steals my purse steals trash." That's exactly my fix now for I have not had a dime in — oh! mercy I have forgotten howlong. If "coming events cast their shadows before them" I have no hope of receiving any more for a long time — for no-where can I see pictures of dimes & dollars and eagles. Alas! Alas! I cant do a thing. Why darling I could not come to you — were you to send for me — unless perchance some of the Summer friends might take a notion to lend me a dollar or two. Oh! yes "The eloquent clink of a dollar or two" is a forgotten melody — all its rich realities are gone — and like the Minstrel who sang the "Last lay" Is only remembered to awaken a sigh that it could not always last. Money! Money who does not want it! Who is there that seeks it not! What will it not do!

Page 84
Had I enough I would or could buy the Crown of any King in Christendom. But there is a treasure awaiting me! Her diamond yea! Anjel eyes will wander over these Scrawled lines and may hap chide me for not writing more legible. Oh! yes my darling you are my treasure — my heart is with you. I must for my own peace and contentment hasten to you as soon as possible.
I declare I must humbly beg your pardon for the hasty manner in which I've written this letter. This is the first of six that I must write to night.
I will enclose a few lines to sister Fannie. This is the second time. Tell her to answer it. I dont know whether she will or not. But hope so.
Give my love to all. Tell Jonnie if he has had the mumps he might have written to me. Hal wont write. I have a notion never to write them again. Tell Gul that unless she writes a PM to some of your letters that I will take it for granted she has something against me at heart.
To Ida and all my love. The same to Sister Fannie.

Write often my darling to

Your Cousie