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Title: Letter from Arthur McKimmon to Sophie Manly, October 25, 1859 : Electronic Edition.
Author: McKimmon, Arthur
Funding from the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supported the electronic publication of this title.
Text transcribed by Bari Helms
Images scanned by Caitlin R. Donnelly
Text encoded by Caitlin R. Donnelly
First Edition, 2007
Size of electronic edition: ca. 12K
Publisher: The University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
2007
© This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text
The electronic edition is a part of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill digital library, Documenting the American South.
Languages used in the text: English
Revision history:
2007-05-22, finished TEI/XML encoding.
Source(s):
Title of collection: Manly Family Papers (#4409), Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Title of document: Letter from Arthur McKimmon to Sophie Manly, October 25, 1859
Author: Arthur Mc
Description: 5 pages, 5 page images
Note: Call number 4409 (Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Editorial practices
The text has been encoded using the recommendations for Level 5 of the TEI in Libraries Guidelines.
Originals are in the Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Original grammar, punctuation, and spelling have been preserved.
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Any hyphens occurring in line breaks have been removed, and the trailing part of a word has been joined to the preceding line.
All quotation marks, em dashes and ampersand have been transcribed as entity references.
All double right and left quotation marks are encoded as ".
All single right and left quotation marks are encoded as '.
All em dashes are encoded as —.
Indentation in lines has not been preserved.

For more information about transcription and other editorial decisions, see the section Editorial Practices.
Letter from Arthur McKimmon to Sophie Manly, October 25, 1859
McKimmon, Arthur



Page [1]
N C. Misery
Oct 25th 1859

My Dear Miss Sophie.

According to my promise which I made to you before I left home viz to write to you before Saturday, I now take the pleasure of so doing. But do not expect any thing lively or interesting, for if there ever was a sad mortal I am one. Ever since Saturday I have had the blues, not so bad in Raleigh however as up here, & I feel more like committing suicide than doing anything else. Imagine yourself in my situation. Here I am, after having spent a week so very, very pleasantly with the fair sex, in the dullest place in the world surrounded by no associates but those of the masculine

Page [2]
gender & with no prospect of fun before me for five long weeks. But in all my trouble "Hope" serves as a beacon light to guide me through the darkness of despair & sorrow & I am somewhat comforted by it. But as you charged me not to write you a dull letter, let us leave this melancholy strain & see if we cannot find something more amusing. I arrived at this charming place safe & sound after a very sad & lonely ride & I am now fixed in my "sanctum" for the rest of the session. The same questions How did you enjoy yourself at the fair? Did you go to the Soiree? have been asked me a thousand times & I am heartily tired of answering them. And worst than all it was reported that I was desperately in love with

Page [3]
Nick William's cousin which to those who were ignorant of the fact I positively denied. But this much I will say to you, that if I had such another week to go over at the end of it I would be either perfectly miserable or just the other extreme. One of the boys said that they expected to see me hugging up Nick now & that I would be one of his strongest friends & supporters in his ball manager election next winter. It affords me much pleasure to say however that I am not the only one in this condition. is worse than I am & Mr Hill is desperate about Miss Sallie R. The fact is that every one who attended the fair is looking very melancholy & you need not be at all surprised to hear of some misfortunate occurrences

Page [4]
before long. There is no news of any importance up here. Several of the boys have been sent off for visiting the fair, & every thing is as quiet & still as death. I did not get an invite to Miss Hill's wedding which was a great disappointment to me. Jim Graham says that Hillsboro is to be turned over this week in celebration of the marriage. My Love to Miss Ida. Tell her that I have been meditating seriously upon what she told me Sunday night & ask her if it is really so. I delivered her message to Bullfrog & he said he was much obliged. Nick desires to be remembered to all of you. Jim sends his love. Now Miss Sophie write me soon & let it be a long & lively letter much more so than the one which I have written to you. Remember me to Mrs Manly & Mrs Grimes. Be sure & write soon to your affectionate friend
Arthur Mc



Page [5]
Joe Saunders has come in my room since I have finished my letter & says make haste & get married & invite him to your wedding.