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Title: Letter from Charles L. Pettigrew to Ebenezer Pettigrew, January 22, 1834: Electronic Edition.
Author: Pettigrew, Charles Lockhart, 1816-1873
Funding from the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supported the electronic publication of this title.
Text transcribed by Bari Helms
Images scanned by Bari Helms
Text encoded by Brian Dietz
First Edition, 2005
Size of electronic edition: ca. 10K
Publisher: The University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
2005
© This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text
The electronic edition is a part of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill digital library, Documenting the American South.
Languages used in the text: English
Revision history:
2005-07-25, Brian Dietz finished TEI/XML encoding.
Source(s):
Title of collection: Pettigrew Family Papers (#592), Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Title of document: Letter from Charles L. Pettigrew to Ebenezer Pettigrew, January 22, 1834
Author: Charles L Pettigrew
Description: 2 pages, 3 page images
Note: Call number 592 (Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
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Letter from Charles L. Pettigrew to Ebenezer Pettigrew , January 22, 1834
Pettigrew, Charles Lockhart, 1816-1873



Page 1
Chapel Hill Jan 22d 1834

Received, this day of Mr E. Pettigrew the sum of $150,00



Dear father

I received your letter containing a draft for $150, and now write you a receipt on the 12th of this month, the letter came at the very right time for on day, the session began about 9 Oclock I received your letter by mail. It would be useless now to express my gratitude to you for this single act of kindness for you have put your children under so great obligations that they can never be too grateful and ought never to be able to convey to you what they feel. While I remained home last spring I heard you frequently express a wish to get a mare like your young mare. The is one on Chapel Hill which I think would be just such an one as you want, she is a mare of blood and is an excellent saddle-horse the same colour as your mare, and I think they would make an excellent match, she is spoken very highly of by all who know her, and is owned by my landlady Mrs Nunn, who wishes to sell her, she asks a hundred and 90 dollars, I told her perhaps you would take her, aknowing that you wanted such an one, and therefore I would write to you, and known whether you would buy her or not If you conclude to buy her you can remit a draft and I can ride her down next commencement. please write we [unrecovered] immediately whether you will take her, or not. The business of the session has again commenced and I am in a very neat and warm room without a

Page 2
room-mate, nor do I intend to take a room-mate because good ones are so hard to find; I had one last session, I was compelled to take him, his brother wrote to me to take him in my room and there by he would be under some restraint. His brother had just graduated, and had left me his room one of the best rooms and some say the best in college and therefore I felt myself under some sort of obliation to him, for the first two months he made no noise studied hard and behaved himself well and properly and I liked him very much, the affection was reciprocated, but after a while he got a fiddle and of course got among the fiddlers in college idle and worthless fellows, then he began somewhat to absent himself from his room and finally he went and staid with one altogether although his trunk was in my room, so we parted and and very seldom see each other, after he left me he began to drink considerably, and to have wines and brandy continually, and boy of about 15, I am afraid he will not do much good in this world. I am in very good health and prepared to study hard. Please answer this letter immediately

and believe me your ever affectionate son

Charles L Pettigrew



Give my respects to Messers Davenport & Breckhouse .

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