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Title: Letter from James Johnston Pettigrew to Ebenezer Pettigrew, January 13, 1844: Electronic Edition.
Author: Pettigrew, James Johnston, 1828-1863
Funding from the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supported the electronic publication of this title.
Text transcribed by Bari Helms
Images scanned by Bari Helms
Text encoded by Sarah Ficke
First Edition, 2005
Size of electronic edition: ca. 10K
Publisher: The University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
2005
© This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text
The electronic edition is a part of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill digital library, Documenting the American South.
Languages used in the text: English
Revision history:
2005-07-26, Sarah Ficke finished TEI/XML encoding.
Source(s):
Title of collection: Pettigrew Family Papers (#592), Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Title of document: Letter from James Johnston Pettigrew to Ebenezer Pettigrew, January 13, 1844
Author: James Johnston Pettigrew
Description: 2 pages, 2 page images
Note: Call number 592 (Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Editorial practices
The text has been encoded using the recommendations for Level 5 of the TEI in Libraries Guidelines.
Originals are in the Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Original grammar, punctuation, and spelling have been preserved.
Page images can be viewed and compared in parallel with the text.
Any hyphens occurring in line breaks have been removed, and the trailing part of a word has been joined to the preceding line.
All quotation marks, em dashes and ampersand have been transcribed as entity references.
All double right and left quotation marks are encoded as ".
All single right and left quotation marks are encoded as '.
All em dashes are encoded as —.
Indentation in lines has not been preserved.
This letter was apparently written on Jan. 13th 1844 and erroneously dated Jan. 13th 1843 out of habit since the year was new. See Mr. E. Pettigrew's specific reply and reference to this letter in his letter of Feb. 1, 1844.

For more information about transcription and other editorial decisions, see the section Editorial Practices.
Letter from James Johnston Pettigrew to Ebenezer Pettigrew , January 13, 1844
Pettigrew, James Johnston, 1828-1863



Page 1
Chapel Hill Jan. 13th 1843 [1844]

Dear Pa,

I arrived here the evening of the day I started and received my trunk that night by the stage; I came very near losing it, and if I had not been down there at the time it came in, it would have gone onto Hillsboro for the barkeeper did not get up to examine the way-bill, but slept on till the stage went out. I delayed writing thus long, that I might know whether I should room by myself or not, so as to write you, and so many new students have arrived, that it is impossible to do so and I have concluded to continue in the same room. A great many persons have joined College this session, which I believe is unusual, the number of students, generally, being less the spring session than the fall one. Our class consists of forty-five, being eight or ten more than last session and it is now the largest class in College and most of our old recitation rooms cannot hold us. Some of the students went down to the Govenor's last week and he told them the same thing that he told you, that my marks were better

Page 2
than any one else in our class.
We have had very bad weather ever since I have been here; it has rained almost every day and sleeted, and came very near snowing twice. It has cleared off however and I hope we shall have some good weather.
This place is a great deal more dissipated in the vacation than in the session and the night I came they were all of them intoxicated in some degree, which, together with cardplaying constituted the principal amusement. Govenor Swain had some of them up before the faculty for their conduct in the vacation, but I believe did nothing to them.
The churches are going on; Mr. Green collected two thousand dollars and Mr. Deems , the Methodist clergyman, eighteen hundred.
Please to give my love to brother Charles and brother William , and believe me to be yo

Your aff. Son

J. Johnston Pettigrew


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