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Title: Letter from James Johnston Pettigrew to his brother Charles Pettigrew, May 5, 1844: Electronic Edition.
Author: Pettigrew, James Johnston, 1828-1863
Funding from the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supported the electronic publication of this title.
Text transcribed by Bari Helms
Images scanned by Bari Helms
Text encoded by Brian Dietz
First Edition, 2005
Size of electronic edition: ca. 11K
Publisher: The University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
2005
© This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text
The electronic edition is a part of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill digital library, Documenting the American South.
Languages used in the text: English
Revision history:
2005-08-01, Brian Dietz finished TEI/XML encoding.
Source(s):
Title of collection: Pettigrew Family Papers (#592), Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Title of document: Letter from James Johnston Pettigrew to his brother Charles Pettigrew, May 5, 1844
Author: J. Johnston Pettigrew
Description: 3 pages, 4 page images
Note: Call number 592 (Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
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Letter from James Johnston Pettigrew to his brother Charles Pettigrew , May 5, 1844
Pettigrew, James Johnston, 1828-1863



Page 1
University of N.C.
May 5th 1844

My Dear Brother,

I received your letter in due time and intended to have answered it sometime ago, but have neglected it as yet. For this negligence I have no excuse, except that when one has studied all the week and and attended society meetings on Friday night and Saturday morning, he feels very little like writing a letter, in the evening.
The studies of the Freshman class are considerably lightened by carrying up the mathematics, and instead of five Algebra recitations a week we have only three. The Faculty have decided that the present course is to difficult for minds so young and untrained and on that account have transferred the study of Astronomy and Natural Philosophy to the Senior year. The present course is that. Prof. Pearce of Cambridge, which is incomparably suserior to other courses on account of its conciseness and brevity; this indeed is carried too far in some instances and his Astronomy consists merely

Page 2
of Mathematics, without ever explaining a single cause or effect. I suppose you know, that Mr. Ralph Graves has been a tutor of Mathematics for some years past: he is very much liked and respected here by all and has repeatedly sent his respects to you and brother William ; I should have included Mr Owen also, who has since left for a professorship at Wake-Forestt. He used to be called Judge, when he was here and was famous for using large words and bombastic expressions; a great many copies of his speeches have been preserved in college, and afford some amusements.
Our society has been progressing and the Dialectic retrograding ever since 1837, last commencement, every Phi member of the Senior class obtained a distinction and of the the ten, who spoke on the stage, seven were Phi's. At this commencement, we are divided about equally, but one-half of our members have a distinction, while only one-third of the other society have, and of the five who take the first distinction, three are Phi's.
They have a large superiority in the Junior, which is the worst class, that has been here for some years. In the sophomore they have one first-distinction man to our three. In the Freshman they have none.
The graduating class is the most talented, that has been here for some years and is quite a large one, which fact, taken in con[unrecovered] with the address, which Bishop Ives will deliver before the historical

Page 3
Society, is expected to attract numerous visitors, and it is hoped that we will have a larger commencement than usual. Both societies, with the assistance of the trustees are making great efforts to build new halls, and I hope they will suc[cee]d, for, our present one is much smaller than the Di's; and being next to the campus is exposed to every who may attempt to listen.
The Bell is ringing for church now. Give my love to Pa and brother William and believe me to be

Your aff brother

J. Johnston Pettigrew


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