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Title: Letter from John Henderson to his mother, Mary Ferrand Henderson, August 23, 1862 (In Which He Discusses Problem of Conscription): Electronic Edition.
Author: Henderson, John, fl. 1863
Funding from the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supported the electronic publication of this title.
Text transcribed by Bari Helms
Images scanned by Caitlin R. Donnelly
Text encoded by Caitlin R. Donnelly
First Edition, 2007
Size of electronic edition: ca. 12K
Publisher: The University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
2007
© This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text
The electronic edition is a part of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill digital library, Documenting the American South.
Languages used in the text: English
Revision history:
2007-05-25, Caitlin R. Donnelly finished TEI/XML encoding.
Source(s):
Title of collection: John Steele Henderson Papers (#327), Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Title of document: Letter from John Henderson to his mother, Mary Ferrand Henderson, August 23, 1862 (In Which He Discusses Problem of Conscription)
Author: John
Description: 3 pages, 3 page images
Note: Call number 327 (Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Editorial practices
The text has been encoded using the recommendations for Level 5 of the TEI in Libraries Guidelines.
Originals are in the Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Original grammar, punctuation, and spelling have been preserved.
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Any hyphens occurring in line breaks have been removed, and the trailing part of a word has been joined to the preceding line.
All quotation marks, em dashes and ampersand have been transcribed as entity references.
All double right and left quotation marks are encoded as ".
All single right and left quotation marks are encoded as '.
All em dashes are encoded as —.
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For more information about transcription and other editorial decisions, see the section Editorial Practices.
Letter from John Henderson to his mother, Mary Ferrand Henderson, August 23, 1862 (In Which He Discusses Problem of Conscription)
Henderson, John, fl. 1863



Page [1]
Chapel Hill N. C. Aug 23rd 1862

My Dear Mother

I received your letter a few and take this opportunity to answer it. I suppose, Len has left home ere now, to battle again for the liberties of his country, that country, which now needs his services more than she ever did before; for a proud and boastful has called into the field six hundred thousand more men, in order to subjugate us and if needs be annihilate us. It seems, that, for every army we destroy, two more new ones spring up in it stead. Where are we going to get the to meet this extraordinary levy of the North, I dont know; though I suppose Congress will take some action on that subject. It makes my very heart sick looking around among the students to find at least one dozen, who, afraid to go home, remained here during the vacation to evade the Conscription Law, the homes of some of whom are in the hands of

Page [2]
the enemy. I see, that a motion has been brought up in Congress, and I hope, it will pass, that the Conscription law shall be rigidly enforced and that persons in the Confederacy, subject to it, shall be taken, whereever found, and that those, who evade it, shall be considered as deserters and treated as such. I would like very much to see Len before he goes back into the army; I wish, you could prevail upon him to come down to Chapel Hill and see me perhaps for the last time. I want to have a long talk with him once more. If he comes you can send the money Watch &c by him. I am sorry to hear that Len is not as well as usual, but I hope, that the army will bring him out. I thought would not like being ordered to Richmond so soon any way; if Captain Bill Howard resigns, he will have to go as a Conscript, so I suppose, he wont resign. I am in hopes, Vance will make a good Governor; I am very well satisfied with the speech, he made in Raleigh. He says "he

Page [3]
intends to know no party during the war." I hope, he will rigorously enforce the Conscription Law, and call into the field every man, that is subject to it. Excuse all mistakes, and

I will remain Your Obedient [unrecovered]

John